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Full text of "The Hatter 1993"

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1 

1 
1 

1 



OPENING 



UrE(?>TYlE(?> 4 



(SPODTS 26 



ODGANIZATION6 56 



CAMPU6 LIFE 66 



CUDDENT EVENTS 116 



PEOPLE 128 



hD& 194 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/hatter1993stetson 




lat fits 

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UNIVEMITY 


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DELAND 

FLODIDA 

32720 




! 


VOLUME 

72 




1993 



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Michelle Taylor vis 
its with friends out 
side the Hat Rack. 



The fifth graders 
ofBlue Lake Ele- 
mentary School 
spent a day ex- 
ploring every- 
thing at Stetson 
during Greek 
College Days. 




2 OPENING 






THE 



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This year Stetson welcomed 
in the largest freshman 
class in many years. It 
was a year of changes in 
attitudes and actions of 
everyone at Stetson. 
Awareness was the word of the day — 
every day. There were activities^ speak- 
ers and organizations planned through- 
out the year to bring unity into the com- 
munity. To be proud^ aware, honest, 
and diligent is to be a member of the 
Stetson Community. So — If the Hat 
Fits ... Wear It. 

OPENING 3 




4 LIFESTYLES 




VERYBOD 

WEARS A 
DIFFERENT HAT 




EVERYONE HAS SOMETHING 
TO OFFER AT STETSON 

The increase in cultural awareness 
throughout every aspect of campus life, 
combined with the diversity Stetson is 
growing towards, has helped Stetson 
students , faculty, and staff to get 
involved and get to know each other in 
a more open and honest way. There 
was a greater respect towards others that could be 
sensed in peoples ' attitudes and actions throughout the 
year. At Stetson, the variety of lifestyles and personali- 
ties has developed a sharing and caring environment in 
which to work, play, study, and live in each day. 

From socials to town hang-outs, the Stetson commu- 
nity is uniting towards a common goal. Whether you 

are greek or independent, a commuter or a townee 

one thing is certain even though everyone wears a 

different hat — we are all striving for Unity in our 
Community. 



Anita Ogden and Holly 
Ingram worked as 
FOCUS advisors to the 
new incoming students. 



LIFESTYLES 5 




The Spring new members of Alpha Chi Omega. 



Ipha Chi Omegas can be seen all over Stetson, 
involved in every aspect of campus life. From 
Mortar Board and Stetson Union Board to 
American Marketing Association and Pi Alpha Delta, 
from Cheerleading to Syncronicity to Rho Lambda and 
Omicron Delta Kappa — Alpha Chis ore never far 
away. 

Within our chapter as well, our sisters are very 
active. This year's campus-wide Alcohol Awareness 
program had everyone sporting "Party-Smart" but- 
tons, and our annual Newlywed Gome raised money 
to be donated to the Alpha Chi Omega foundation. 
Also, thanks to our Miss Greenfeather, Julie Koenig, 
Alpha Chi placed third in the week long event. 

Our Social events can't be beat. Our fantastic 
socials with the men of Alpha Tau Omega, Lambda 
Chi Alpha, Sigma Phi Epsilson, and Phi Sigma Kappa 
were some of the highlights of fall semester. The sisters 
also enjoyed our annual Winter Formal at Disney's 
Grand Floridian this year. Indeed, our date socials are 
always great fun. Some of the recent events we've 
enjoyed are Italian Wedding, April Fool Around, and 
Woodser. 



Ten Anderson, Cari Aspacher, Tiffany Attanasio, Wendy Bastin, Kim Battaghni, Jennifer Bel- 
lomy, Aimee Bialek, Jenny Boyd, Donna Bryan, Amy Carr, Jenn Cole, Chris Cominsky, Bren- 
da Cyr, Barbara de la Fe, Wendy Dickinson, Jackie Douglas, Shannon Dowdy, Ester Duca, 
Missy Emrich, Nicole Evasius, Jane Fleming, Jenny Gewartowski, Susan Grueschow, Kim 
Hewson, Lara HoUoway, Caroline Karsner, Paige Knaebel, Julie Koenig, Kimberly Kunz, 
Hilary Latcheran, Cyndi Late, Donna Lenz, Diane Long, Debbie Lowman, Christy Marks, 
Alyson Mitchell, Jennifer Mitchell, Brook Nelson, Julie Palmer, Sus Pollacek, Alison Propes, 
KeUy Richardson, Tracy Rostanzo, Dawn Seay, Christie Serb, Jennifer Smith, Amt Stateler, 
Tracy Thomas, Nicole Titus, Robin Van Winkle, Mandy Winston, Dena Baker, Allison Boul- 
ware, Mary Cappelli, Nelly Guirgis, Jackie Hall, Rebecca lori, Jessica Kirkwood, Kristie Marc- 
hand, Sonya Marino, Kristen Moody, Laurie Polsky, Kristyn Whetstone. 



6 STUDENT LIFE 




Jeff Weakley, Eric Reming- 
ton, Jim Nichols, and Shane 



Murray at the ATO Viking 
Party. 



ALPHA 





OMEGA 



beta Psi Chapter of Alpha Tau Omega has once 
again shown greatness throughout campus, and 
the community. Our excellence in social service 
continued to shine through project like: Youth Motiva- 
tors, Adopt a Road, visits to the Duvall Home, and the 
Miracle Mile Walk for Abused Children. ATO raised 
money for the American Cancer Society by winning 
the Greenfeather competition. Our Brotherhood grew 
with outstanding new members, and a great Brother 
and Pledge retreats to Ocala National Forest. Our 
party scene was phenomenal! With great socials, like 
Jungle Party and Wet'n'Wild, we set new standards. 
And Viking Party remained the biggest, wide-eyed, 
bonafide, party of the year. ATO is shaping the lead- 
ers of tomorrow by shaping Stetson's campus today. 
Trend-setting and awe-inspiring. Way to go ATOI. 



Chris Beaver, Craig Stevens, 
Jeff McConnell, Rollins Brown, 
George Ossi, Mark Crawford, 



Ray Ravis, Stijn Kortleven 
during the Tri-Delt Wet'n'Wild 
Social at the ATO House. 



Jeff Bartholomew, Chris Beaver, Roy Bongers, Mike Bowdish, Rollins Brown, John Cawrse, 
Robert Clemente, Mark Crawford, Mike Cullen, Sam Elsberry, Craig Evans, Russ Fields, Alan 
Gravano, Greg Hemming, Jason Hiss, Sean Hobbs, Michael Holbein, Mark HoUey, Reid Hub- 
bard, Chris Hufe, John Kendall, Adam Kennedy, Josh Kindred, Rob Kinzer, Stijn Kortleven, 
Jared Lanza, Mike Leavy, Steve Magriby, Jason Maughan, Jeff McConnell, Jason Mullins, 
Shane Murray, Jim Nichols, Guy Nieman, Josh Nye, George Ossi, Pete Ossi, Brian Perry, Bill 
Pitts, Donny Purcell, Ray Ravis, Eric Remington, Deve Rohe, Gilbert Rooth, Elias Samaan, 
Seth Shapiro, John Sourial, Craig Stevens, Harold Sankard, Chad Taberner, Derek Thomp- 
kins, Eric Von Deck, Adrian Warfield, Jeff Weakley. 



ALPHA TAU OMEGA 7 



LirE 



[ 



IN 



[ 



CHAUDOIN 



Chaudoin Hall is fhe 
largest residence hall on 
cannpus, with two hun- 
dred and forty-two female resi- 
dents. It has a mixture of fresh- 
men and upper-classmen to 
help make it a place where 
everyone can fit right in. Tradi- 
tion is what the staff has main- 
tained throughout the year with 
programs like: Who's shooting 
in Chaudoin; Chaudoin Home 
Video; Roommate Gomes; 
Alcohol Awareness; Mordi 
Gras; Fiestas; and the Dr. Truth 
Show. This is just a sample of 
the many programs Chaudoin 
had to offer its residents. Who 
could possibly get bored? The 
lobby is always filled with peo- 
ple watching movies, playing 
the piano, or just wanting to 
hang out and procrastinate. 
Chaudoin's basketball team 
won second place in intramu- 
rals, and our residents showed 
Stetson how much we like to talk 
on the phone by winning the 
Admissions Phone-A-Thon con- 
test. Chaudoin is one big family. 
It's the place "Where Everybody 
Knows Your Name!" 




Mamey Nolan and Susan 
Ridley get ready to go out. 



8 CHAUDOIN HALL 




Jennifer Grable, Michelle 
Richards, Mike Hunter, and 
Nicole Abbruscato. 



Emily Teige, Freya Johnson, 
Denise Kubik, Jackie Hall, 
Lori Petley, Stacey Pied- 
mont, Tracy Vinson, Maleah 
Nolan, Tracey Humphrey, 
Kim Gronemeyer, Heather 
McGrath, Nelly Guirgis, 
Kelly Morgan, and Melissa 
Hart. 




Melody Meyer, Joanna 
Williams, Lianne Bishop, 
Anne Dary, Anna Compagine 
(R. A.), Sabiha Ghoghawala, 
Lisa Wilburs, Jenn Maendel, 
Neja Merkel, Rhonda Dunn, 
Eileen Parungao, Angela 
Paumier, and Becky lori. 



Chaudoin Hall Staff: 
Nikki Salamone, Chris 
Cominsky, Gigi Murphy, 
Donna Bryan, Emily 
Teige, Julie McLean, 
Muffy Hunter, Becky 
Overton, and Anne Com- 
pagine. 




2nd Mainstream: Julie 
McLean (R. A.), EUen Ragland, 
Liesel Wilburs, Bekah Boothe, 
Kerri Jones, Jill Webber, Jen 
Laurence, Jen Moran, Tammy 
Collins, and Rhonda Hill. 



CHAUDOIN HALL 9 




Carmen A., Marney N., 
Andrea C, Lisa R., Nell W., 
April P., Liz K., and Jan- 



nett R. hangin' out at Ron 
Jon Surf Shop at sister 
retreat. 



DELTA 



he Omega chapter of Alpha Xi Delta recognizes 
the importance of eternal sisterhood. A close 
bond is kept between alumnae and active sisters. 
Alpha Xi Delta received the Alumnae Relations Award 
at the 1 990 Greek Banquet. The sisterhood is built 
through sister retreats, alumnae teas, and other sister 
activities. 

"Have Fun!" Alpha Xi's at Stetson definitely live up 
to their motto with our Cruise Ship Formal, Socials, 
movie nights, and date functions. Always smiling. 
Alpha Xi's get the most out of life. In the classroom, at 
the social scene, or on the field, the positive attitude is 
evident. The Sportsmanship Award is presented to the 
Omega Chapter for this reason. 

Another strength is the loyalty to service. Alpha Xi 
Delta's charitable works include: "Send a kid to 
Camp," the March of Dimes, Children International, 
and Choose Children. 

Founded ... Lombard College 1893. Colors ... Dou- 
ble Blue and Gold. Flower ... Pink Rose. Motto ... 
"Have Fun, Have Friends, Have Faith, Have Love." 
Mascot ... Teddy Bear. 



Jill Aardema, Kimberly Aldrich, Carmen Alvarez, Pearl Ashcraft, Bekah Boothe, Jennifer Bon- 
czek. Heather Bowman, Stephanie Bressan, Erin Bucholz, Lori Burdick, Andrea Carbone, 
Anna Compagino, Paige DeArmas, Mary Dempsey, Kim DeVore, Erin Dineen, Thanh Dinh, 
Katrina Duggar, Dawn Dunn, Meghan Eyer, Christy Freeman, Tabitha Fuchs, Gina Garritani, 
Becky Grafer, Emily Hayes, Tia Hayes, Shannon Hillegass, Christie Houmes, Liz Kinane, Lau- 
ren Konitzer, Inger Loftheim, Chrissy Ludington, Tracy McElveen, Lori McGratten, Mercedes 
McNally, Grenadette Meyers, Melissa Miller, Kelly Morris, Sheri Murphy, Marney Nolan, 
April Powell, Janette Ramos, Lisa Reeves, Christi Remirez, Kristy Richardson, Susan Ridley, 
Jenny Roberts, Tara Ryan, Jenny Small, Joann Stratakes, Tiffany Trenkle, Rachel Ward, Nell 
Wender, Natalie White, Carrie Whitehead, Stacy Wilkinson, Cindy Wintersteen. 




1993 Pledge Class Members: 
Lori B., Kim D., Heather B., 
Lauren K., Erin D., Rachel 



W., Erin B., 
Christi R., Tara 
and Mellisa M. 



Bekah B., 
R., April P., 



10 ALPHA XI DELTA 



j-is Kross Social: Christine 
hea, Lori Finn, Denise Ser- 
at, Rhonda Burk, Rhonda 



Dunn, Dawn Rasmussen, 
Abby Loreto, and Cindy 
Cable at the ATO House. 



ZETA 





he Sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha have had an awe- 
some year with two outstanding Pledge Classes. 
The Chapter ended the year with 72 active mem- 
bers. The year was highlighted with socials with Sigma 
Nu, Sig Ep, Phi Sig, and ATO. Every event was fun for 
oil involved. The sisters had an adventurous time at the 
Second Annual Crown Royale in Orlando, and at 
Spring Fling in Daytona. 

The sisters of ZTA also were busy with Greenfeath- 
er, Parents Weekend, and Crown Classic. The year 
was another winning year for Greenfeather with Amy 
Sue Tomlinson as our Miss Greenfeather and Jen Ator 
as Greenfeather Co-Chair. Parents Weekend was led 
by our own Sydney Millard, and was a great success. 
Beth Wactlar was outstanding as Focus Co-Chair. The 
Chapter is yet busting at the seams with outstanding 
eaders both within and outside the Chapter. 





my Koss and Lisa Harris at the 
5ta Tau Alpha Fall Picnic. 



Jen Ator, Karen Baird, Rachel Bayuk, Gina Barry, Rachel Bayuk, Debbie Braber, Karen Brake, 
Rhonda Burk, Cindy Cable, Shelly Carpenter, Tammy Collins, Becki Crews, Anne Dary, Laura 
Dunifon, Rhonda Dunn, Barbara Funigiello, Erin Furmanick, Christina Gawson, Sabiha 
Ghoghawala, Michele Girlinghouse, Freya Gutterson, Candy Harmon, Lisa Harris, Amy 
Hessler, Kelly Holzapfel, Cathy Howe, Keri Hunt, Amy Johns, Freya Johnson, Joy Joseph, 
Julie Knauth, Amy Koss, Denise Kubik, Kim Lane, Lucy Leach, Abby Loreto, Mary Manly, 
Melissa Marshall, Heather McAleer, Jen McAllister, Jody McCarty, Carrie McGrath, Neja 
Merkel, Sydney Millard, Denise Moninger, Joy Murray, Melissa Muzzy, Mercedes Pacheco, 
Beth Parsons, Cindy Prout, Dawn Rasmussen, Ashleigh Scudder, Cindy Shea, Kim Simonds, 
Janet Smout, Lisa Stewart, Marti Stuedle, Melissa Surface, Michelle Taylor, Emily Teige, Mar- 
iane Tjo, Kim Tuckis, Tami Ueda, Christi Vannoy, Beth Wactlar, Kate Waters, Sheryl 
Williams, Nikki Winfield, Tonya Wisemiller, Marcia Wright. 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 11 



Jo Helkowski chows down 
on some pizza after a late 
night of studying. 



Greg Gomez, Tom Novak, 
Francis Babiasz, Pat McKen- 
na (Head Resident) and Mike 
Kirschner watch football on a 
1" T.V. after the power went 
out. 




Troy Garcia and John 
King of Upper 4, study in 
the lounge. 



Steve Bender, Matt Helming, 
Mario Lanzisera, Mark 
Helming, and B. J. Pak. "The 
Lower 6 Late, Late, Night 
Crew." 



12 CORDIS HALL 




^ GOOD TIMEcS... I 




Pat McKenna (Head Resi- 
dent) "is always smiling." 



CORDIS HALL 13 




DA 



Ctll 



ALPHA 




Row 1: George Oliver, Brian Waller, Jeffrey Thompson, Charles Hughes, Christian Gibson, W. Trent Tonsmeire, Chris Huizinga, Jason DeLofeuzo, Marcus Ricciani. 
Row 2: Stevin Merrill, Lance Rodriguez, Jeff Paulk, Ryan Broderick, Adam Steckley, Ross Bunson. Row 3: Lawrence Call, Guy Mower, Mathew Anderson, Federica 
Palle, Kevin Miller, John Crowther. Row 4: Anthony Baratta, Brian Durney, Kevin Kline, Sean Panico, Clinton Darch, Dimitri Diatchenko. Row 5: William Barnwell, 
Fred Bullad, Brian Rost, Matt Ronda, Robert Daniels, Robert Lucas, Jeff Moffett, Matthew Miller, Keith Hyland. Row 6: Richard Kolb, Ben Edwards, Eliseo Alba, 
Denny Rager, James Gagen, Adam Williams, Jeremy Templeton, Chris Ruffner, Mariah DeHaven. 



14 LAMBDA cm ALPHA 



993 Pledge Class Member 
re: Christi M., Wendy 
., Rhonda H., Michelle 
., Heather H., Andrea 



B., Brooke M., Tara V., Kim 
O., Jen B., Toni S. J. B. 
Brown, and Stacy D. 



DELTA 





his year Delta Delta Delta was active in the com- 
munity, on campus, and socially. The Tri-Deltas 
participated in Habitat for Humanity, Paint Your 
Heart Out and Yapis Beach Clean Up. They also spon- 
sored, again, the Red Cross Blood Drive along with Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

The members of Tri-Delta are also seen in many 
campus organizations such as SUB, ODK, Mortor 
Board, Youth Motivators, Beta Beta Beta, Syncronicity, 
Student Ambassadors, and FOCUS. They ore proud to 
boast of Tri-Deltas being president in such organiza- 
tions as SGA, Order of Omega, and Yopi. 

Tri-Delta was also very busy socially beginning with 
our annual Crush Party in the Fall. Then came Hal- 
loween with the Lambda Chis, a quad with the Phi Sigs 
and Alpha Chis, Fingerpainting with the Sig Eps, 
Pharoah with the the Delta Sigs, and Wet-n-Wild 
Warfare with the ATO's. Oh yes, it was a fun year 
socially. On the athletic side, Tri-Deltas worked 
towards achieving the Christianson Cup for the 5th 
year in a row. 

Tri-Delta's strength also shined through our close 
relations with our Alumnae. Delta Delta Delta excelled 
and boasted to be "Built on Tradition." 



amara, Ashley, Holly, 
layle, Kristen, Heather, and 



Toni get ready to go to Fra- 
ternity Row. 



Julie Adikes, Ruth Aesehleman, Heather Aland, Elizabeth Bassett, Jennifer Beaver, Andrea 
Betts, Leanne BiUington, Soma BoniUa, Kamila Bosek, Jennifer Brown, Wendy Brown, Kathy 
Cartee, Shannon Cook, Jayma Cooper, Emily Crews, Stacy Davis, Camille Gampero, Carrie 
Gareau, Staci Gionis, Jyl Gottlieb, Angela Grinstead, Heather Hahn, Lisa Hatfield, Rhonda 
Hill, Heidi Hoffman, Kristie Ruber, Holly Ingram, Julie Johnson, Kerri Jones, Amy Keith, Erin 
Kelley, Michelle LaRue, Jen Lawrence, Karen Lenn, Gayle Littleton, Brooke Martin, Ashley 
McComb, Carey McMullen, Kathleen McQuone, Susan Miller, Kristen Moriarty, Kareen Mour- 
ra, Krista Mullin, Christi Morgan, Molly Myers, Kim Olsen, Patti Peach, Karen Peeples, Penny 
Potts, Kelly Reilly, Kathy Reynolds, Nicole Shulke, Michelle SchuUer, Laura Shealy, Toni 
Smith, Tamara Striggo, Julie Thomas, Jen Thompson, Lucie Tuck, Tara Valente, Jill Weber, 
Meredith Weigel, Meg Westphal, Daphne Williams, Ashley Yeager. 



DELTA DELTA DELTA 15 



B THE u mps 




NEMEC [lAiJ. 



Nemec Alpha is the ulHmafe in freshman residence 
halls. Alpha's twenty-three first year students, 1 1 
men and 1 2 women, with the inclusion of a few 
upperclassmen, have created a most interesting and often 
entertaining living environment based around their diver- 
sity. Alpha represents a seemingly unlimited number of 
social and ethnic backgrounds as well as a wide range of 
interests. Around campus Alpha's are involved in the 
Honor's Program, Intervarsitv Christian Fellowship, BSU, 
Wesley House, Stetson's softball and soccer teams, SGA, 
the Stetson Reporter, Circle K, Youth Motivators, Cheer- 
leading, and the forensics team. Alpha is also representa- 
tive of seven different Greek Organizations. Among all of 
this diversity. Alpha has still managed to have a produc- 
tive year, building new friendships and exemplifying the 
Residential Life theme: "Unity in out Community." 

ALPHA Residents: Clint Adams, Sofiya Alhassan, 
Michelle Bottex, Mary Cappelli, Rhesa Carroll, John 
Clark, Bryan Cochran, Melanie Cook, Mark Galasky, Ted 
Ghostbear, Billy Gillen, Jamie Hine, Joy Joseph, Jessica 
Kirkwood, Tim Loo, Brian Meredith, Brian Neidhardt, 
Matt Nystrom, Vaishali Potel, Julie Pearson, Sal Pirrone, 
Andrew Richmond, Mitzi Russell, Mono Shah, Kim 
Simonds, Tina Villanova, Michele Whisnant, and Jarrod 
White. 

Now in its second year, the Honors Pod continues to 
flourish. The Beta community, made up of sixteen return- 
ing residents and thirteen freshmen, has been character- 
ized this year, by both its relaxed inviting environment, 
and the closeness of its people. Betans are involved in: 
Youth Motivators, BSU, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, 
Students Trandscending Homophobia, Circle K, the Stet- 
son Hatter and Reporter, the Stetson Orchestra, Students 
Together Against Sexual Assault, SGA, Forensics, volun- 
teer work throughout the community, Cheerleading, the 
flute choir, Crew, and four Greek organizations. Despite 
the plethora of activity, the people of Beta still found plen- 
ty of time to bond, such as: trips to the Sugar Mill; a pil- 
grimage to Walt Disney World; open study groups; nights 
out at Club Europe; the dog track and the bowling alley; 
a ping-pong tournament; a home-cooked dinner spon- 
sored by the women; painting a childrens' shelter; and 
many birthday parties. The Honors Pod has truly become 
home for its residents, and memories have been forged 
here that will never tarnish. 

BETA Residents: Ivette Alvarado, Dena Baker, 
BethAnne Copeland, Cynthia Destefano, Laura Dunifon, 
Sally Elias, Ady Hall, Christine Helm, Diane Heritage, 
Joyce Nailling, Tiffany Smith, Heather Vande Hei, Tricio 
Zippay, Ken Biancard, Rich Buxman, Michael Holbein, 
Bill Kern, Kent Meckley, Josh Nye, Chris O'Brien, Keef 
Owens, Dexter Palmer, Rick Pruneda, Ray Ravis, Lance 
Starr, Paul Walker, Jeff Weakley, and Justin Williams. 



Diane Heritage, Tricia Zip- 
pay, Laura Dunifon, Beth 
Ann Copeland, and Cynthia 
Destefano, before the Resi- 
dential Life Formal. 

Julie Pearson makes a long, 
long, long phone call. 



16 NEMEC HALL 




Melanie Cook, Jessica Kirk- 
wood, Joy Joseph, Mona 
Shah, Tina Villanova, and 
Paul Bevington at a hall pro- 
gram. 



Rhesa Carroll, Vaishali 
Patel, and Sotiyn Alhassan. 




DELTA Residents: Penny 
Potts (R. A.) M. Atobelli, 
K. Blackshear, M. Darios, 
D. DeRosa, J. Doyle, J. 
Fiesta, S. Gionis, F. Hare- 
wood, Z. Hoover, B. Jef- 
feries, P. Hobbs, L. Klund, 
J. Meltzer, D. Mier, S. 
Moses, M. Oilia, C. 
O'Neill, M. Owens, E. 
Pfarr, B. Pratber, K. 
Schaffer, B. Sundgren, D. 
Summers, M. Supprenat, 
B. Telesford, B. Thomp- 
kins, M. Willis. 
EPSILON Residents: 
(Upper) Liz, Kate, Jen- 
nifer, Debbie, Samaira, 
Tanya, Robin, Veronica, 
Celines, Brinda, Nancy, 
Lisa. (Lower) Carol, 
Sandy, Angel, Jessica, 
Laura, Katie, Christina, 
Ophie, Kristen, Aimee. 
GAMMA Residents: 
Michele Taylor (R. A.) 
Melanie Parthree, Cicy 
Jenkins, Amy Johnson, 
Stephanie Vann, Shana 
Workman, Javqueline 
Hawkins, Erin O'Neill, 
Charlene Castleman, 
Carrie Whitley, Susie 
Marston, Marci Booth, 
Meg O'Donnell, Heather 
Keegan, Angelique 
Washington, Anissa 
Carter, Cynthia Collins, 
Melissa Pilgrim, Kelly 
Holzapfel, Christ! Van- 
noy, Stephanie Hollis, 
Robin Cooper, Danielle 
Debarros, Lori Burdick, 
Taro Ryan, and Julie 
Cipolla. 



NEMECHALL 17 



Delta Residents volunteer 
some of their free time to 
spend with children. 




Delta Residents have a big 
birthday party. 

Christi Vannoy, Danielle 
Debarros, Robin Cooper, 
Kelly Holzapfel, Angelique 
Washington, Julie Cipolla, 
Melissa Pilgrim, Stephanie 
Hollis, and Lori Burdick. 



18 NEMECEALL 




THE 



YADIETY IN 



NEMEC HALL 



Delta is the Environmental/Social Concerns pod of 
Nemec Hall. We have had great fun fulfilling this 
title by cleaning the beach, donating Thanksgiving 
dinners to needy families, volunteering on Head Start 
Day, washing puppies at the Humane Society, volunteer- 
ing at the Duvall Home, making love beads, planting our 
garden, and of course the title of #1 recyclers (of every- 
thing, right BOYS?) on campus. The residents of Delta cre- 
ated lasting friendships and learned about transferring, 
maturity (?), studying (?), members of the opposite sex, 
and domestic disturbances this year. 

Nemec Epsilon is constantly "expressing ourselves" in 
all we do. We had a fun year of making lasting friend- 
ships and sharing a little of ourselves in the things we do 
each day, whether just hanging out in the lounge, going 
out, losing weight (yes!), or attending hall programs. 

The Gamma Girls have had a terrific year in Nemic 
Hall. We started the year on a sweet note with our fondue 
party then had fun making caramel apples for the Hal- 
loween trick-or-treaters. Gamma adopted a family for 
Thanksgiving and delivered a big turkey dinner with all 
the fixings. We ended a great year by decorating study- 
boards. We've all made some lasting friendships this 
year. 



NEMEC HALL 19 




Heidi, Carmen, Ellen, Car- show off those angelic 
olyn. Tammy, anf Fielding smiles. 



Pi Beta Phi was the first national sorority for women, 
as well as the first to be established on Stetson's 
campus. The tradition continued as this year was 
filled with sisterhood, spirit, and excitment. 

Pi Phi's straightened their halos and aimed extra 
high towards academics this year. As a result. Pi Phi 
had the best overall GPA's on campus. 

The Pi Phi's love to help others. Once again, many 
Pi Phi's were Youth Motivators. The annual Head Start 
Halloween and Easter Ego Hunt parties were a lot of 
fun and a huge success. They also helped with a food 
drive at Thanksgiving and collected books for the pedi- 
atrics department at a local hospital. Pi Phi's this year 
also sold doughnuts to benefit their national philan- 
thropies, Arrowcraft and Links to Literacy. 

Tnis year Pi Beta Phi welcomed an energetic bunch 
of new angels. Pi Phi was not to be outdone socially, 
either, as they enjoyed their Winter and Spring For- 
mals many socials, and the annual Beaus and Arrows 
Valentine's Dance. 

The summer of '93 was filled with magic and excit- 
ment as Pi Phis from Stetson joined other Pi Phis from 
around the country at the 1 26th Pi Beta Phi Nationa' 
Convention in Orlando 



Jemiy Baker, Heather Barber, Betsy Barker, Angle Brown, Julia Caldwell, Brandi Davidson, 
Darcy De-.Hne, Frances Esteves, Tara Fitzgerald, Karen Folsom, Kristen Folsom, Cindy Frazer, 
Caroline Gallrein, Kim Goldstrohm, Heidi Grimes, Stacey Hannaford, Carmen Hendricks, 
Kristen Hildreth, Lori Jaggers, Kristi Johnston, Carolyn Keating, Heather Keegan, Lori Kee- 
ton, Lanie Lansdell, Brynn Louhgran, Laurie McConnell, Margaret McDow, Julie McLean, 
Gigi Murphy, ICathy Natella, Anita Ogden, Nancy Newman, Megin O'Donnell, Melissa Osmom, 
Melanie Parthree, Kate Phipps, Julie Plocar, Ellen Ragland, Shea Sargeant, Fielding Shaw, 
Stacey Schultz, Amy Snell, Tammy Snively, Sara Sunderman, Lisa Uchrin, Joy Woodson, Gail 
Zimmerman, Eve Abbott, Travey Humphrey, Amy Johnson, Allison Righter, Melissa Ross, 
Mitzi Russell, Tiffany Smith, Mary Ellen Thompson, Alysa Trakas, Stephanie Vann. 




Our awesome Pi Phi 
Pledges hang out together 



at Plegde Retreat. 



2i) PI BETA PHI 



James, Bill, Will, Joey, Sig Ep social. 
Andy, and Rob party at a 




PHI 



EPSILON 



Sigma Phi Epsilon continued its strong tradition of 
excellence with another exciting year of accom- 
plishments. Sig Eps pushed to keep the Chancel- 
lor's Cup by working in the Biq Brother program at 
Blue Lake Elementary, building nouses for Habitat for 
Humanity, coaching a youth league soccer team, and 
keeping the Adopt-a-Road clean. 

Sig Ep's recuitment in deferred rush was among the 
best. Fall semester's hard work paid off nineteen qual- 
ity men pledges Sig Ep. This boosted manpower to 
over seventy members, and Sig Eps remained the 
largest fraternity on canpus. 

As always, Sig Ep's had the best socials on campus. 
Down in the French Quarter with Pi Phi and Child's 
Ploy with Alpha Chi Omega kicked off the year fol- 
lowed by the Halloween Party with the Zetas and New 
Year's in November with the Tri-Delts. Fingerpointing 
and Bahama Blues were the highlights of the year. For- 
mals were held in Altamonte Springs and at Cocoa 
Beach. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon enjoyed an outstanding year on 
campus, in the community, and in the national frater- 
nity. Once again, Sigma Phi Epsilon has a proven 
record of excellence and will continue to do so in the 
future. 



Bill Hannaford, Frank Moireale, Ryan Smith, Ty Monk, Mayy Lightiser, Todd Bennett, George 
Galante, Mark Hamilton, Bruce Hasenkeng, Don Stewart, Todd Parks, Will Gribble, Eric Cin- 
namond, Brian Beese, Phil Taylor, Luis Parra, Phil Schultz, Joey Raska, Matt Nystrom, Shawn 
Hine, Rob Dominica, Tom Lopez, Clay Collins, Grant Davis, John Murphy, Jeff Vail, Tim Reb- 
ber, Tom Horton, Mark McDonald, Bill Weir, James Alvarez, Kirk Parker, Jerry Hensel, Alan 
Wood, Dan Phelan, Wesley Scott, Scott Beeley, Chris Spicer, Andy Teubner, John Mueller, 
Matt Dwiel, Brian Elwell, Jeff Goddard. 



Rob, Frank, Grant, George, 
and Bill build the walkway 



for the Bahama Blues 
Social. 



PHI SIGMA EPSILON 21 



WHECE Tl-ir 




MEMODIEA. - ^^,, 



CONDAD HM 



UJJ 



Conrad Hall's theme this 
year was , "Where the 
Memories Begin." Every- 
one gave Conrad a sense of 
enthusiasm, energy, and involve- 
ment. 

Greenfeather was our first of 
many great successes. We won 
first place in the category of Resi- 
dence Halls. Third North won 
"Most Halloween," and the first 
floor took "Best Overall" in the 
cake decorating contest. 

The residents were also 
involved in intramurals: soccer 
(which came in second) basket- 
ball, volleyball, tennis, and flag 
football. Everyone got involved. 

During Homecoming we creat- 
ed a colorful, tropical rainforest 
float that included costumes and 
sound effects. For all the efforts, 
the float won first place. 
Some of the things Conrad's resi- 
dents were involved in were: 
Kindergarten Day, skating at 
Orlando Ice Skating Place, a BBQ 
with Cordis Hall, rape crisis, col- 
lecting food for the Humane Soci- 
ety (with Stetson Hall), and volun- 
teering in the Head Start. 

All this makes for a very excit- 
ing life in Conrad Hall. 




Mary Ellen Thompson 
and Tonya Phillips during 
Kindergarten Day. 



22 CONRAD HALL 




Joyce St. Thomas takes 
part in Kindergarten Day 
finger painting. 

Erin Smith, Libby Hogen, 
and Carrie Colling get the 
float ready for the parade. 




Angle Jimenez, Mande Bray- 
ton, Tina-Marie Capestany 
and Chun Chase are ready to 
go down Woodland Blvd. on 
the tropical rainforest. 



Caty Hart, Ana Soto, 
Cristi Peterson, Lauren, 
Alexandra Mauer, Mande 
Brayton, Angle Jimenez, 
Laura Hutson, Catherine 
Hileman, and Stacey 
Davis (2nd South) on 
their way to a Luau. 





The Women of Conrad Hall. 



Conrad Hall Staff: Angle 
Jimenez, Caroline Karsner, 
Lori Fuin, Barbara de la Fe, 
and Carrie CoUing. 



CONRAD HALL 23 




Resident Advisor Ray Angie Devore, Angela Gay, 
Ravis talks on the phone. and Carra Davies hang out 
together. 



24 SMITH HALL 




THE WODII) 



Smith Staff: (back) Kyriakos 
Drymonis, Ray Ravis, Jim 
Greene, Luis Parra, (front) 
Dawn Redmon, Joyea War- 
ren (Head Resident) and 
Holly Ingram. 



ACCODDING TO 



6Mrm 



Throughout the year Smith Hall 
has seen a number of new and 
exciting events. The most obvious 
change was when the men of Smith 
found their hall had gone co-ed. At 
first, the girls were disappointments 
about their housing assignments, but 
once they got to know their room- 
mates, resident advisors, and hall- 
mates, everyone knew it was going to 
be a great place to live. 

During the Fall, residents took part 
in ice-breakers, camping trips, and 
the Great Smith Hall Water War! 
Although tfie war was only suppose 
to last an afternoon, residents could 
be found carrying tfieir super-soaker 
guns around all year. For the Spring 
semester, residents followed their 
baseball playing hallmates to Con- 
rad Park to cheer for the Hatters. 

Before and after Spring Break, the 
lawn of Smith was scattered with res- 
idents who were praying for any ray 
of sunshine that they might catch to 
work towards the ultimate tan. Other 
great outdoor unforgettable spring 
events were hollwide bor-b-ques, 
intramural games, spring fling pool 
parties, volleyball games, and water- 
gun fights. All in all, the year accord- 
ing to Smith was a great success- 
everlasting memories were made. 




Brian Frimyer hangs out in 
upper eight. 



SMITH HALL 25 




26 SPORTS 





o 



HATTERS 



CHEERING THE HATTERS 
TO VICTORY 

This was an exciting year for sports at 
Stetson. Each team began the year with 
optimistic attitudes and a revived ener- 
gy to claim victory. 
The year began with renewed hope 
and confidence by all athletes that this 
would be a year to remember for Stetson 
— and it was. Along with all the excellent sporting 
events, several other exciting events occurred. The 
Orlando Majik set up practice in the Edmunds Center, 
giving everyone a first hand look at the Shaq. Stetson 
also hosted the NCAA basketball Championships. 

As the year draws to a close we have to say goodbye 
to Mike Mugavero the head coach for the soccer team, 
and to the excellent basketball coaching of Glen Wilkes. 
This was definitely a year to cheer GO HATTER! 




Aaron Gallo winds up to 
pitch a strike. 



SPORTS 27 




Kerry Blackshear gets set The Stetson Hatters block 
to make a basket. their opponents and take 

control. 



?g SPORTS 




ASKETBAti 



SLAM 

DUNK TO VICTORY 



As Head Coach 
Glenn Wilkes pre- 
pared to coach his 
last season ot bas- 
ketball for Stetson, 
the Hatters were 
giving It their all. 

With Kerry 
Blackshear Dim- 
Itri Cosmlos. Dar- 
ren DeRosa. Jeft 
Foster, Travis 
Garrett Peyton 
Keaton. and Pat- 
rick Sams joining 
the list of Stetson 



basketball play- 
ers, along with 
returning players: 
Bryant Conner. 
Donell Grier Tony 
Overton, James 
Staten, Tremayne 
Thomas, Ehren 
Wallhotf. Rob 
Wilkes, and 
George Wood, the 
Hatters were 
bound to have 
many victories 
during the 1992- 
1993 year 




Back Row (1 tor) Dr Glenn WiLkes( Head Coach), Frank Bur- 
nell (asst coach), Donell Gner, George Wood, Peyton Keaton, 
Jeff Foster, Travis Garrett, Patrick Sams, Scott Waller (grad. 
asst coach), David Turner (manager) Front Row James Stat- 
en, Bryant Conner, Dimitn Cosmios, Tony Overton. Ehren 
Wallhoff, Kerry Blackshear, Tremayne Thomas, Darren 
DeRosa, Rob Wilkes. 



SCOREBOARD 

12/01 Florida 70-52 (L) 

12/04 Bethune-Cookman 81-74 (L) 

12/05 Central Mich. 84-83 (L) 

12/11 Michigan State 78-59 (L) 

12/12 CSV 65-61 (L) 

12/19 McNeese State 80-74 (L) 

12/20 SMU 87-77 (L) 

01/02 St. Joseph 's 82-75 (W) 

01/04 Buffalo 89-82ot (W) 

01/07 Bethune-Cookman 82-79 W 

01/09 Florida Int'l 66-63 (L) 

01/11 Florida Atlantic 63-60 W 

01/14 Samford88-71(L) 

01/16 Georgia State 93-81 (L) 

01/18 Central Flor. 98-81 (W) 

01/21 Centenary 81-77 (W) 

01/23 SE Louisiana 83- 77 ( W) 

01/30 Mercer 75-70 (L) 

02/01 North Florida 95-75 (W) 

02/06 Florida Int'l 82-75 (L) 

02/11 Samford 76-57 (W) 

02/13 Georgia State 100-89 (L) 

02/15 South Florida 89-73 (L) 

02/18 Centenary 95-82ol (W) 

02/20 SE Louisiana 79-74 (W) 

02/27 Mercer 94-87 CW) 

03/02 Central Flor. 95-82 (W) 
Hatter Classic (Deland) Los Angeles 
Classic Los Angeles) TAAC Games 
(Orlando Arena). 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 29 



Donel! Grier makes the 
point for Stetson. 




30 SPORTS 




MEN'S BASKETBALL 31 



WOMEPISPWVSKETBALL 



SHOOT 

TO WIN 



SCOREBOARD 



12/02 
12/04 
12/05 
12/13 
12/15 
12/18 
12/19 
12/28 
01/02 
01/05 
01/09 
01/14 
01/16 
01/19 
01/21 
01/23 
01/30 
02/01 
02/04 
02/06 
02/11 
02/13 
02/18 
02/20 
02/23 
02/27 
03/04 



Bethune-Cookman 67-72 L 
Memphis State 63-92 L 
Nicholls State 84-60 W 
North Carolina 42-97 L 
UNC 62-69 L 
Dartmouth 86-83 W 
Furman 86-105 L 
Ball State 73-53 W 
Georgia South. 43-97 L 
Florida A&M 66-98 L 
Florida Infl 50-97 L 
C. Charleston 85-87 L 
Georgia State 59-65 L 
South Florida 68-76 L 
Central Florida 79-69 W 
SB Louisiana 86-62 W 
Mercer 68-75 L 
Buffalo 71-74 L 
Flor. Atlantic 70-104 L 
Florida Int'l 55-102 L 
C. Charleston 47-58 L 
Georgia State 58-47 W 
Central Flor 75-66 W 
SE Louisiana 55-58 L 
Florida 55-87 L 
Mercer 85-80 W 
C. Charleston 56-76 L 



The opening of 
the 1992-1993 
year looked good 
for the Lody Hat- 
ters. With Head 
Cooch Coren Truske 
and Asssltant Coach 
Kim Wilson, the 
Lady Hatters were 
coached well. The 
returning players. 
Tracy Branden- 
burg, Amy KnoufT 
Kristen Morlarty, 



Knsten Follis, 
Trevor Lever, Kim 
Lucas, and Char- 
malne Milton, 
along with new- 
comers: Cindy 
Collins, Lamllla 
Ford, Susan Mar- 
shall. Melody 
Schlndler, and 
Taucler Smalls, are 
a combination that 
will be hard to beat 
during this season. 




>PORTS 



Back Row (1. to r.): Head Coach Caren Truske, Amy 
Knauff, Lamilia Ford, Taucier Smalls, Melody 
Schindler, Tiffany Trinkle, Kristen Moriarty, Char- 
maine Milton, Assistant Coach Kim Wilson. Front 
Rov.' (1, to r.): Kim Lucas, Susan Marston, Tracy 
Brandenburg, Kristen Follis, Cindy Collins, Trevor 
Lever. 





The Lady Hatters get the Kristen Moriarty makes 
ball away from their oppo- two points for the Hat- 
nents. ters. 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 33 



Kristen Moriarty gets 
past the defense to score. 




Kristen Follis shoots for 
two points. 



34 SPORTS 



Kim Lucas shoots past Tracey Brandenburg 
her opponents. looks for an opening. 




Kristen Moriarty shoots 
from the side to score two 
points. 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 35 



LOVE 

HURTS 



SCOREBOARD 

Men 's (M) Women 's (W) 
Schedule 

11/7 (W) Flagler Toum. 

11/11 (M)Embry-Riddle 

2/3 4/2 (M, W) JacksonviUe 

2/6 (M) Florida Inlem'l 

2/7 (M) 2/12 (W) Lynn Univ 

2/9 (M, W) North Florida 

2/11 South Florida 

2/13 Air Force 

2/17 4/9 (M) 2/19 (W) UCF 

2/24 (M,W)Romns 

2/25 3/17 Florida A&M 

2/26 (M, W) Florida Atlantic 

3/6 (M) 3/10 (W) James Mad. 

3/8 (M) Appal State 

3/9 (M, W) CoL Charleston 

3/10 (M) lUinois Stale 

3/11 (M, W) Creighlon 

3/23 4/8 Georgia State 

3/24 (M) Monmouth (W) Clev. 

4/6 Citadel 

4/9 Mercer 

4/10 Centenary 



Back (1. to r.) Head Coach 
Bill Russell, Denny 
Brown, Tim Burnett, T. J. 
Rush, Eliseo Alba, James 
Alvarez, Alan Wood, 
Chris Collany. Front 
Dave Brockway, Denny 
Rager, Edwin Omura, 
Kevin Fuller, student 
asst. coach Farris Briggs. 



Women's head 
cooch, Kothy Ber- 
nard and Men's 
head coach Bill Rus- 
sell counted on 
1992 to be the year 
the Hatters broke 
records. With eight 
returnees, James Al- 
varez, Edwin Osura, 
Eliseo Alba, David 
Brockway Chris Col- 
lany, Denny Rager 
and Larry Wood, 
and four new team 
members, Timothy 



Burnett, Terry Rush 
Kevin Fuller and 
Donny Brown, the 
men's team was 
ready Lor a suc- 
cessful year. The 
women's team In- 
cluded GIgl Murphy. 
Julie Johnson, and 
Heather Keegan as 
returnees, along 
with Jeannle Bluten- 
thal, Marti Stuedle, 
Jarmila Trneckova, 
and Stephanie 
Vann. 




36 SPORTS 




Chris Collany returns the Seniors Gigi Murphy and 
ball to his opponent. Denny Rager. 




Left to Right: Head Coach 
Kathy Bernard, Marti 
Stuedle, Jamila Trnecko- 
va, Julie Johnson, Gigi 
Murphy, Heather Kee- 
gan, Stephanie Vann, 
Jeannie Blutenthal. 



TENNIS 37 



SOCCER 



NOT JUST 

KICKING IT AROUND 



SCOREBOARD 

Lose(L) Win(W) 

09/05 Drexel(W) 

09/07 Centenary (W) 

09/09 South Florida (L) 

9/15 Florida Southern (W) 

09/19 E. Stroudsburg (L) 

09/20 St. Francis (Pa.) (L) 

09/26 Barry (L) 

09/30 Jacksonville (W) 

10/03 Mercer (L) 

10/07 Central Florida (L) 

10/10 Florida Atlantic (L) 

10/15 Florida Int'l(L) 

10/17 Miami (Ohio) (L) 

10/23 Dayton (L) 

10/24 Xavier(L) 

10/28 Rollins (L) 

11/03 Georgia State (W) 

11/16 C. of Charleston (L) 




Row 1: John King, John 
Doyle, Will Jackson, 
Kevin Johnson, Chris 
Conte, Scott Mueller, Jim 
Foley. Row 2: Head Coach 
Mike Mugavero, Kyle Rid- 
dlebaugh, Marcus Ric- 
ciani, Chris Evans, Josh 
Howell, Clint Adams, 
Neal Allen, Doug Rood, 
Matthew Gober, Matthew 
Owen, Asst. Coach Bob 
Wilson. Row 3: Sal Pir- 
rone, Jimmy Williams, 
Tom Seeley, Sean Britton, 
Mike Laskowski, Shawn 
Starbuck, Stefan Brecher, 
Yon Stnible, Mitch Stone. 



With 1992 being 
Mike Mugovero's 
second and lost year 
OS Heod Cooch of 
Stetson's soccer 
teonn. the Hotters 
were geored ("or o 
strong performance. 
Senior ployers Kevin 
Johnson, Kyle Rid- 
dlebaugh. Doug 
Rood. Chris Conte, 
Pot Duff Jim Foley, 
ond Will Jockson, 
along with John 
King. Mike Laskow- 



ski, Scott Mueller, 
Matthew Owen, Sal 
Pirrone, Marcus Ric~ 
cioni, Tom Seeley. 
Shawn Starbuck. 
Mitch Stone, Yon 
Struble, Jimmy Wil- 
liams, Clint Adams. 
Neal Allen, Stefan 
Brecher Sean Brit- 
ton, John Doyle. 
Chris Evans, Mat- 
thew Gober, ond 
Josh fiowell form 
this years Soccer 
team. 




38 SPORTS 




Matthew Gober kicks the 
ball to a teammate closer 
to the goal. 




SOCCER 39 




40 SPORTS 




1992 Tri- 
Captains: 
Will Jack- 
son, Kevin 
Johnson, 
and Chris 
Conte. 



SOCCER 41 



Junior Dawn Marie Dunn Sophomore Jenny Roberts 
waits for the serve. looks for her teammates. 




Back Row (1. to r.): Head 
Coach Janiece Holder, 
Cija Novak, Heather 
Niemas, Catherine Hile- 
man. Heather Graig, 
Dawn Dunn, Lori Bur- 
dick, Michelle White, 
Assistant Coach Mary 
Chilson. Front Row: Stu- 
dent Coach Jeff Wilson, 
Erin Dineen, Jenny Sut- 
ton, Liz Long, Jenny 
Roberts. Not Pictured: 
Jennifer Nelson. 



42 SPORTS 




'tm >t> 




SPIKE 

THE BALL TO WIN 



7/1 e leadership oF 
Head Coach Janiece 
Holder Is leading the 
Lady Hatters volley- 
ball team Into a 
strong season. With 
the strength of 
Seniors Heather 
Gralg. and Liz Long 
and returning play- 
ers Dawn Dunn. 
Catherine Hileman, 
Jenny Roberts, and 



Michelle White, the 
team Is sure to have 
a successful year. 
The additions of 
Lorl Burdick, Erin 
Dineen, Jennifer Nel- 
son, Heather Nie- 
mas. Cija Novak, 
and Michelle White, 
will help to build a 
strong team for the 
1 993-1 99 A school 
year 




Freshman Erin Dineen 
returns the ball to the 
other team. 



SCOREBOARD 

09/05 11114 C. of 

Charleston 
09/05 10/01 North Florida 
09/09 10/06 Florida 

Southern 
09/12 11/13 Florida Int'l 
09/12 10/2711/10 

Jacksonville 
09/15 Rollins 
09/18 Georgia Tech 
09/18 Western Carolina 
09/19 Samford 
09/23 Florida A&M 
09/25 Florida Tech 
09/29 10/15 Bethune- 

Cookman 
10/08 Mercer 
10/10 10/23 11/14 SE 

Louisiana 
10/11 Centenary 
10/14 10/17 10/29 VCF 
10/1 7 Eastern Kentucky 
10/20 Florida Southern 
11/03 RiiUins 
11/07 I Innda \lhiiitu 



Senior Heather Graij 
retxirns the ball. 



VOLLEYBALL 43 



Mark Schlein 




Back Row (1. to r.): Cliff 
Medallo, Steve Hansen, 
Jeff Bartholomew. Middle 
Row: Mark Schlein, Sean 
Welch, Jason Clark, T. J. 
Rush, David Benedict, 
Forrest Taipei, Erik McK- 
ean, David Hooker. Front 
Row: Michael Garriques 
(head coach). 



HMTIEKJL 




44 SPORTS 




FOOT 

ACTION 



Both the mens' 
and womens' cross 
country teams start- 
ed the year strongly 
The women's team 
consisted of six 
returning runners: 
Kristen Follls, Tricia 
Frost. J ana Morri- 
son. Leigh O'Reilly. 
Christ! Thorn, and 
Gwen Valencls. The 
men's team has 
eight returning play- 



er s: J eft Bar- 
tholomew. David 
Benedict. Jason 
Clark, Steve Hansen. 
David Hooker Erik 
McKean. T J. Rush, 
and Mark Schlein. 

Fourth year 
Women's coach. 
Maggie Dobson. 
and First year Men's 
coach. Michael Gar- 
rlques. led the teams 
this year 




Men 's Schedule: 

9/12 Stetson Hatter Inv. 

9/19 St. Leo Inv. 

9/26 Florida Southern Inv. 

10/3 Florida Inv. 

10/10 Nova Inv. 

10/16 Florida Collegiate 

10/24 Flagler Tri-Meet 

10/31 Trans America Champ. 



9/12 
9/19 
9/26 
10/3 
10/10 
10/16 
10/24 
10/31 



Women 's Schedule: 
Stetson Hatter Inv. 
St. Leo Inv. 
Florida Southern Inv. 
Florida Inv. 
Nova Inv. 
Florida Collegiate 
Flagler Tri-Meet 
Trans America Champ. 



Back Row (1 to r.): Tricia 
Frost, Gwen Valencis, Kris- 
ten Follis. Middle Row: Mag- 
gie Dobson (head coach), 
Susan Joy, Jana Morrison, 
Christi Thorn, Karen Tame. 
Front Row: Sheryl Vil- 
leneuve, Diane Enriquez. 



CROSSCOUNTRY 45 




Jeff Smith rounds third Chris Shields winds up to 
base and heads for home. pitch a strike. 



46 SPORTS 



HIT 

AND RUN 



Once again 
Coach Pete Dunn 
leads the 1993 Stet- 
son Baseball team 
into a strong year. 
With returning play- 
ers Williard Brown, 
Craig Corbett. 
Eduardo Dedos. 
David Ferreira. Dex- 
ter Fulton, Aaron 
Gallo, Javier Gomez, 
Chris Hannunn, 
James Hul'stetler. 
Aaron latarola, Jeff 
Kistler Mike Masilo- 
nis, Jason Perme- 
nter Chris Sawyer, 



and Chris Shields 
and newcomers. 
Chuck Beale, Chad 
Berardi. Doug Bol- 
ton, Matt Branz. 
Ozzie Del g ado. Nick 
LoMonaco, Bobby 
Mauro, Danny 
Nash, J a red Sapir- 
stein. Jeff Smith, 
Kevin Smith, Michael 
Stover, and Jahi 
Waytes. the Stetson 
Hatters hope to 
make the trip to 
Omaha. Nebraska, 
to the College World 
Series. 





SCOREBOARD 

02/01 Team Nissay-Japan (EXH) 
02/05-02/06 Mercer 
02/07 02/16 Rollins 
02/13-02/14 South Florida 
02/1 7 Bethune-Cookman 
02/19-02/20 South Florida 
02/22 Florida Atlantic 
02/24 Bethune-Cookman 
02/27 St. Bonaventure 
03/01-03/02 Miami 
02/03-02/04 Western Carolina 
03/06 Purdue 
03/08-03/13 Stetson Invit. 
03/15-03/16 Siena 
03/16 Massachusetts 
03/18 The Citadel 
03/19-03/20 04/16-04/17 Charl. 
03/23 St. Xavier 
03/24 Ohio State 
03/25 Cornell 

03/26-03/27 04/09-04/10 UCF 
03/31 04/14 Florida 
04/02-04/03 04/23-24 Fl. Int'l 
04/13 04/20 Jacksonville 
04/29-04/30 Florida A&M 
05/14-05/16 Trans Amer. Tour. 
06/04-06/12 Coll. World Series 



Rowl: Doug Bolton, Chris Han- 
num, Nick LoMonaco, Craig Cor- 
bett, Dexter Fulton, Ozzie Delga- 
do, Eduardo Dedos. Row 2: Javier 
Gomez, David Ferreira, Chris 
Sawyer, Kevin Smith, Jason Per- 
menter, Michael Stover, Chad 
Berardi, Jared Sapirstein, Matt 
Branz. Row 3: Pete Dunn (Head 
Coach), Bobby Mauro, Aaron 
Gallo, Aaron latarola. Chuck 
Beale, Rick Hall (Asst. Coach), 
Glenn Brickley (Trainer). Row 4: 
Chris Shields, Jeff Kistler, Mike 
Masilonis, Willard Brown, James 
Hufstetler, Danny Nash, Jeff 
Smith, Jahi Waytes. Not Pictured: 
Mike Pinckes (Assistant Coach). 



BASEBALL 47 



48 SPORTS 




Willard Brown looks 
for a pitching signal 
from the catcher. 





rpEa 





BASEBALL 49 



Michelle Taylor, Amy 

Knauff, and Tracy Bran- Holly Davis tags base 

denburg are the seniors before her opponent can 

on the 1992 softball team, reach safety. 




Lisa Harris at bat. I 




50 SPORTS 




SOFTBALL 



FAST 

PITCH EXCrrEHENT 



The Lody Hatters 
played a strong 
game this year. 
From their first 
game against 
Bethune-Cool<man 
College their energy 
and excitement 
could have easily 
driven them straight 
to the top. 

With the enthusi- 
asm ot Stetson's 
head sottball coach, 
Janice Holder, the 
returning members 



Lois Bass, Tracy 
Brandenburg, Holly 
Davis. Shannon 
Dowdy Lisa Harris, 
Amy Knauff, J ana 
Morrison, Jennifer 
Pogue, Amy Stateler 
and Michelle Taylor 
the team seemed 
almost invincible. 
With the addition ot 
Joy Joseph and Jen- 
niter Roth, this was 
a team to detinitely ■ 
watch as the year 
progressed. 




SCOREBOARD 

2/23 Bethune-Cookimm College 
2/26 North Florida Tournament 

y/est Georgia 

Eckerd 

UNC-Wilmington 

North Florida 

3/1 UNC-WUminglon 

3/3 Campbell 

3/6 Robert Morris 

3/9 BridgeKoler Slate 

3/12 UNC-Wilmington Tournament 

3/13 VNC-Wilmington Tourrmment 

3/15 College of Charleston 

3/23 Youngstown University 

3/25 Colgate 

3/27 Brown 

3/31 Trinity Christian 

4/2 Webber College 

4/6 Bethune-Cooliimm 

4/8 Selon HaU 

4/13 Webber College 

4/20 North Florida 

4/30 TAAC Championships 

5/1 TAAC Championships 



Back Row (1. to r.): Jana 
Morrison, Jennifer Pogue, 
Michelle Taylor, Amy 
Knauff, Lois Bass, Joy 
Joseph, Amy McCaslin, 
Holly Davis. Front Row: 
Tracy Brandenburg, Lisa 
Harris, Amy Stateler, 
Shannon Dowdy, Diana 
Palm. Not Pictured: Jen- 
nifer Roth 



SOFTBALL 51 



1993 HATTERS 




HATTER STAFF 



Janiece Holder, Head Coach 

.a I-IoIJct crirt-rs her fifth year as 
idsofihalU-oach, 
1 loldt-r. TKinit-d 1992 TAAC Coach-of- 
guuk-d the H:ics' ro a runni-r-up finish m 
TAAC Softball Toumanu-iu. 
A 1988 graduate of Stelson. Holder was 
a member o( the llaircr Softball and volleyball teams' while earning 
her B.S. degree in Pliysic.l Edueation. 

Holder h.i5 ak> served its Slelxn's Head Volleyball Coach the 
past five seasons. 



Mary Wilbanks , Assamm Coach 

Mary WiUxinks, in her second year as 
assistant coach, is a 1987 graduate of Stet.wn. 

A three-year letteI^^•lnner in softba 
VX'ilbanlis earned her B.A. degree in Physic 
lilucalionalld currently teaches Physical Educatl, 
Jl Oala.xy Middle School ill Deltona, Fla. 



Sue Qto'c. AMeiic Trainer 

Guyer is in her llnrvl year as Stetson's 
assistant athletic trainer. 

N.A.T.A. certified. Guyer became 
certified as an E.M.T. in the summer ot 1997. 

Earning her B.S. in Physical Education 
from Castleton State in 1988, Guyer earned her 
Master's of Science m Education from Old R-minion in 1990. 



SU FAST FACTS 



Ucation I 'el.iiid, Ela. 

Enrollment 1,070 

Founded 1883 

Conference Trans America Athletic 

National Affiliation NCAA I 

Nickname Hatters 

Colors Green & White 

President fV- H. Douglas Lee 

Athletic Director Bobjacoby 

Sports iDformation Director Tom McClellan 

Assistant Sports Inform-ition Director Tom Snyder 

SID Phone (904) 822-81 30 

Athletic Dept. Phone (904)822-8120 

Athletic Dept. Address Campus Box 83.S9 

Stetson Univerisry 

DeUnd, FL 32720 








15 Lois Eass, So-lL. OF, 5-7. 122 

Psychology Major ... Winter Haven, Fla. ... 
Winter Haven H.S. ... Bom 1/19/73, in Ft. Pierce, 
Fla. ... Batting average of .267 in 24 games in first 
season on squad ... 1 1 RBI's ... Two game-winning 
RBI's. 



1 1 Tracy Brandenburg, Sr-3L, SS, 5-6, 139 

Psychology Major ... Longwood, Fla — Lake 
Brantley H.S. ... Bom 11/5/71, in Hialeah, Fla. ... 
1992 TAAC Player-of-the-Year and All- 
Conference First Teai'n member ... 1992 Hatter 
Defensive Award Winner ... Ranked in NCAA 
Women's Division 1 for RBI's and triples last season 
Bart ing average of . 28 2 ... Team- lead ing 29 RBI's .. . 
Eight doubles, six triples, three homeruns. 

9 Holly Dasds, Jr-2L, IB/OF, 5-8, 140 

Business Major ... DeLeon Springs, Fla. ... 
Pierson Taylor H.S. ... Bom 1/12/72, in DeLand, 
Fla. ... Saw action in 40 out of 45 games last season 
... Baftingaverageof.260... 10 RBI's... Fiveforfive 
in stolen bases ... TTiree game-winning RBI's ... 
1991 Most Improved Award honoree. 



10 Shannon Dowdy, Jr-2L, P/3B, 5-5, 134 

Biology Major ... Auhumdale, Fla. ... 
Aubumdale Senior H.S. ... Bom 3/9/72, in Winter 
Haven, Fla. ... 1992 Stetson MVP ... 1992 TAAC 
All-Conference First Team honoree ... SU record- 
holder for most strikeouts in one game { 1 2, 1992 ) 
and in a season (133, 1992) ... '92 record of 15-11, 
1.55 ERA ... Battingaverageof.319, second best on 
team ... 14 RBI's ... TTiree doubles, three triples ... 
Alpha Chi Omega Sorority. 



4 Usa Harris, Jr-2L, P/OF, 5-2,116 

Finance Major ... Native of Winter Haven, 
Fla., Bom 11/17/72 ... Winter Haven H.S. ... 
Record of 9- 10, 3.35 ERA ... Battingaverage of .239 
... 13 RBI's ... Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority 



17 Joy Joseph, Fr-HS, 2B, 5-7, 168 

Business Major ... Fem Park, Ra. ... Lake 
Howell H.S. ... Bom 2/10/74, in Orlando, Ra ... 
Member of 2nd Team All-Conference and 
Honorable Mention All-County Teams at Lake 
Howell ... Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority. 



52 



1993 



TER 




6 Amy Knauff, Sr-3L, C, 5-9, 148 

Political Science Major ... Jacksonville, Ra. ... 
Allen Nease H.S. ... Bom 10/25/71 in Alexandria, 
Va. ... 1992 TAAC A 11 -Conference Second Team 
honors ... Batting average of .233 after reporting 10 
games into season from Hatter basketball team ... 1 3 
RBl's ... Three doubles, 1 triple ... Fielding average 
of .987 ... Seven game-winning RBI's. 




I J ana Morrison, So-IL, OF, 5-9, 144 

Mathematics Major ... Native of Ocala, Fla, 
bom 10/8/73 ... Vanguard H.S. ... 1992 Stetson 
Coach's Award winner... Batting average of .1 13 ... 
4 RBI's ... Two-year letterwinner on Hatter Cross 
Country Team. 







14 Jennifer Pogue, Jr-2L, 3B/C, 5-5, 169 

Finance Major ... Naples, Fla. ... Lely H.S. ... 
Bom bll^lll, in Lafayette, Ind. ... 1992 TAAC All- 
Conference Second Team honors ... '92 Hatter 
Offensive Award and Academic Scholar Award 
winner ... Battingaverage of .33 1 in 40 games ... 23 
RBI's ... Tliree doubles, two triples, one homenin ... 
Alpha Chi Omega Sorority. 

16 Jennifer Roth, Fr-HS, INF, 5-6, 160 

Biology Major ...Hollywood, Fla. ... Hollywood 
Hills H.S. ... Bom 8/7/74 in Miami, Fla. ... Scholar 
Athlete Award winner for Broward County .... 
Famed Coach's Award senior year ... Class 
President all four years at Hollywood Hills ... J.V. 
and varsity cheerleading captain. 



2 Amy Stateler, Jr-2L. 2B, 5-6, 126 

Communications Major ... Lakeland, Ra, Bom 
^/ISPl, in Indianapolis, Ind. ... Lakeland H.S. ... 
Hatters starting second-baseman last two seasons ... 
Batting average of .271 in 45 games ... 17 RBI's ... 
Five doubles, one triple, one homerun ... Alpha Qii 
Omega Sorority. 



13 Michelle Taylor, Sr-3L, OF, 5-6, 129 

Political Science Major... Great Falls, Va., bom 
10/22/71, in Butler, Pa. ... Hemdon H.S. ... Hats' 
starting leftfielder past three years. ..Battingaverage 
of .222 in 39 games ... 1 5 RBI's ... Tliree stolen bases. 



53 



GOLF 




54 




56 ORGAmZATIONS 





ATS 

OFF TO 
UNITY 



STETSON STRIVES 
FOR UNITY 

This year's school theme was 
Unity in the Community, and 
Stetson took definite steps to 
ensure unity within every 
aspect of Stetson life. This was 
a year of increased awareness by the stu- 
dents , faculty and staff. From student 
ambassadors to Crew, from Habitat for 
Humanity to Yapi, from the Multicultural 
Diversity Council to Homophobia Aware- 
ness everyone was getting involved and 
motivated — making this a landmark 
year in Stetson's history. Hats off to Unity 
in the Community. 



SUB woVked towards 
Unity in the Community. 



ORGANIZATIONS 57 




STUDENT UNION BOARD 

Steve Magriby, Angela Paumier. Celia Klein. Anthony Santino, Teri Anderson. Jane Fleming. Brian Connell. 

Stetson Union Board (SUB) is " a programing board which plans and oversees all campus wide activities through several dif- 
ferent committees. " 




BAPTIST STUDENT UNION 

The Baptist Student Union (BSU) "otters activities including Thursday night vespers, care packages, ice cream socials. Mission 
Emphasis week, and more. " 



58 ORGANIZATIONS 




COLLEGE BOWL 

The College Bowl "team represents the University at intercollegiate tournaments that test competitors on general knowledge in 
every academic discipline. " 




WESLEY HOUSE 

Wesley House is "a service organization: members participate in fellowship activities, vespers, RLC programs, retreats, state 
meetings, and more. " 



ORGANIZATIONS 59 




INTO THE STREETS 

Jenny Gewartowski. Jane Fleming, Jarrod White, Angle Jiminez. Hilary Latcheran (President). Lee Church. 

The purpose of Into the Streets is "to facilitate Stetson students' volunteering in charitable projects, and to promote the spirit of 
volunteerism on campus. " 




HABITAT FOR HUMANITY 



Habitat For Humanity Is "a service organization that works to provide housing for qualified families In need through a variety 
of activities. " 



60 ORGANIZATIONS 




Y.A.PJ. 

Youth Advocating Planetary Improvement is a group dedicated to "Informing and educating ttie community of DeLand and Stet- 
son'd campus about environmental issues and concerns. " 




CREW 

The Crew Team is a group that "competes with other schools and Is a member of the United States Rowing Association. 



ORGANIZATIONS 61 




STETSON HATTER YEARBOOK 



STETSON REPORTER 



Cynthia Destefano. Jennifer Hiers. Darald Stubbs (adv.). 
Jill Woods (adv.). Kelly Morris. Brian Connely. 

The yearbook "provides students with opportunities to 
write, photograph, type, sketch, and edit, while producing 
the University yearbook. " 



Kent Meckley (Editor), Michelle Taylor. David Alvin. Gar- 
rette Granroth (photographer). Dr. Dickson (advisor). 

"The Stetson Reporter works to bring the latest news to 
Stetson and the community of a weekly basis. " 




TOUCHSTONE 

The weekly contributors and supporters of Poetry at an Uncouth Hour. 

The Touchstone Literary Magazine is "published once a year and is made up of short stories, plays, photographs, and art work 
by Stetson students. " 



62 ORGANIZATIONS 




PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 



PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 



Anthony Porcdii (IFC President), Darald Stubbs (Advisor). 
Julie Caldwell (PH President) . 



Darald Stubbs (Advisor), Mandy Winston, Keri Hunt. Les- 
ley Baird. Carrie McGrath, Michelle La Rue, Meredith 
Weigel. Julie Caldwell. Ellen Ragland. Heidi Grimes. 




INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL 



Back Row (I. to r.): John Murphy, Robert Steele, Matt Rhenigans, Jake Bebber, Robert Samaan. Frank Morrealle, Chris Gibson, 
Larry Call. Chris Collins. Chris Huizinga, Darald Stubbs (Advisor). Front Row: Grant Davis, Jim Nichols. Robb Flowers. Anthony 
Porcelli. Kevin Kline. Scott , 



ORGANIZATIONS 63 



The open house at Wesley House, 
at the beginning of the year, wel- 
comed new and returning students 
to Stetson. 

Pi Beta Phi sisters at their "Down 
in the French Quarter" social. 

The brothers of Sigma Phi Epsilon 
at their Winter Formal 1992. 





64 ORGANIZATIONS 



Jodi McCarty and Kim Simonds 
hanging out at the ZTA House. 



Jim Nichols and Josh Kindred at 
the ATO annual Viking Party. 




ATO brothers waiting to soak their 
next victim outside the Tri-Delt 
' S House. 




ORGANIZATIONS 65 



Casino 
Night is 
one of the 
first activi- 
ties for stu- 
dents, fac- 
ulty and 
staff to 
have a hat 
tippin' 
good time. 

Ceha Klein 
and Teri 
Anderson 
help hand 
out bever- 
ages at 
Oktober- 
fest. 




66 CAMPUS LIFE 



AT TIPPIN' 

GOOD TIMES 




THERE'S SOMETHING FOR 
EVERYONE AT STETSON 

/n between studying for tests and 
writing papers students could be 
found enjoying themselves at the 
various day and day events spon- 
sored by campus life. Along with 
the annual Luau, Greenfeather and Sun- 
splash, the Harvestfest, the Last Splash 
Bash and several concerts at the pit were 
enjoyed by the students , faculty and staff. 
This year was full of hat tippin' good 
times for everyone to enjoy. 



"Peer Pressure" per- 
formed during Focus to 
make new students aware 
of what they might 
encounter during their 
first year. 



CAMPUS LIFE 67 



Anita Odgen, Kevin Kline, Patti Peach, Beth Wactler, Kristen 
Moriarty, Craig Stevens, Dave Probert, Kim Battaghni, 
Monty Hoeft, Ellen Ragland, Heidi Grimes, Kathleen 
McQuone, Holly Ingram, Julie Jerbi, Shea Sargeant, Lanie 
Landsel), Todd Ancher, Jennifer Lawrence, Rob Dominica, 
Will Gribble, Mike Bowdish, Jenny Gewartowski, Wesley 
Scott, Eric Remington, Brooke Nelson, Jeff Paulk, Karen 
Lenn, Jeff Thompson, JoAnn Stratakes, Jill Weber, Kamila 
Bosek, Megin O'Donnell 

Students and parents reviewed the registration materi- 
als they received during FOCUS. By getting the informa- 
tion while parents were still there, students were able to 
make the best choices possible for their first semester. 






W STUDEi 



Janice Hart, Rich Walsh, 
Donnie Hitchcock, Brian 
Durney, and Jeremy Tem- 
pleton attend the recruit- 
ment at Wesley House earli- 
er this year. 



SOAR, along with FOCUS 
helped welcome new students 
to the Stetson Community 
through day long events and 
special programs geared to help 
incoming students adjust to col- 
lege life. 



68 CAMPUS LIFE 






ocus 

IN ON THE 

NEW YEAR 



'[/S»- Friends on Campus — was 
illy assigned by students for students. 
Ing hMw hard the transition to a uni- 
setting can be, the members of 
have made that transition easier for 
^rowd of students! 

It a crowd! The program seemed tai- 
rior-mmim^or the amount of people that we 
weicomea this year — the largest freshmen 
class in ten years, as well as a larger nontra- 
ditional group. Throughout the week before 
classes began, FOCUS advisors were rushing 
with their fellow students-to-be in a whirl- 
wind experience that was meant to prepare 
one for college life. 

This year's FOCUS co-chairs, Kristen 
Moriarty and Beth Wactlar, welcomed the 
new students aboard and, with the help of 
their excellent staff and advisors, guided the 
new members of the Stetson community 
through signing up for classes, the Universi- 
ty Experience, Risque Business, a scavenger 
hunt, pool Olympics, and ^'Waynes World." 
This was one of our best years ever! 



Lisa Stewart stops 
at the book store to 
prepare for the first 
day of classes. 



FOCUS 69 




NTHE 



MOVE 
AGAIN 



\you come b<ick, there s just some- 
it about the old place. Whether 
: Stetson dorm is your first extend- 
' firom home or not, there's still a 
tistance — from home and from 
''his is the end of the innocence ..." 
hhe most unusual thing about being 
home is that sense of power which 
~om being on your own. Jennifer 
%n, from Salem, New Hampshire, says 
Umfthe most surprising thing about being on 
campus for her was being "totally independent 
(and ) on your own. " 

"If your don't read, YOU FAIL!" Mitzi Rus- 
sell from Gulf Stream, Florida, said. She had a 
difficult time getting self-sufficient. With no 
parents nudging you awake and only very lim- 
ited restrictions on movement, many students 
ofienfind it hard to be active early in the morn- 
ings. 

The Stetson experience can be especially 
frustrating for transfer students. Raymond 
Diaz, from Bushnell, Florida, has also done 
work at USF and PHCC. He has had to work 
out a "cut down on time" that he had not been 
used. 

Even though Stetson is a great place to be, 
all of us still find we have a lot of adjusting to 
do. 



After moving in, the 
phones lines begin 
ringing, as students 
look up old friends 
from the previous 
school year. 







70 HOMECOMING 




MOVING IN 71 



I 



UAU OFFERS 

A TASTE OF 
TROPICAL PARADISE 



Was it Hawaii, Figi, or the Caribbean? 
No, it was the annual Luau, near the Hat 
Rack. This yearly event, sponsored by food 
services, offers a change of pace in everyday 
"commons "food. 

Through the meal card line and adorned 
with leis around their necks, the hungry 
masses entered the wooden cabana. Inside 
there were various food choices, including 
many types of seafood. The most popular 
was shrimp. But there were also several 
tables piled high with fruits and other treats, 
arranged in a Hawaiian feast fashion. 

The students enjoy the Luau because it not 
only offers them a change from the typical 
menu, but they are entertained by a band 
while sharing in the camaraderie the Luau 
offers. 



Students were able 
to select food at the 
Luau from buffet 
style tables, piled 
high with food. 



f 




72 CAMPUS LIFE 



Emily Hayes, Grenadette Mey- 
ers, Becky Grafer, Megan Eyre, 
and Jeanette Ramous enjoy the 
food and conversation at the 
annual Luau. 




HAWAIIAN WAV 73 



Anthony Nievez, Evan Bell, and 
Chris Trinkle take part in the 
sausage eating contest. 




Emily Cruz, Karen Lenn, Gayle Littleton, 
and Jenny Beaver sample the German food 
at Oktoberfest. 

The Sauerkraut Slide drew the biggest 
crowd of spectators at the day's events — 
and the bravest contestants. 



74 CAMPUS LIFE 





KTOBERFEST 

PROMOTES 
GERMAN HERITAGE 



mnual Oktoberfest offered 
imunity the opportunity to 
lerman Heritage. 

event included a band and 
lentertained the crowd with 
dance of Germany. During 
fal contests challenged the stu- 
xge eating, yodeling, and the 
Slide. 
¥ge tarp covered with sauerkraut 
and other slippery substances help partici- 
pants slide from one end to the other. 

All in all the event proved to be a great 
success for the second year in a row. 




OKTOBERFEST 75 




EVER 

SAY 
GOODBYE 



"Don't Say Goodbye" was the theme of 
this year's Homecoming. The festivities 
began with a banner competition and "Hat- 
ter Night out at Halftime!" On Friday a 
homecoming parade took place down Wood- 
land Blvd. ^^1 

This yeaj^^omedian, Adam Sandler, 
nth a guest ^wpearance by David Spade) 
from Saturday Night Live, drew a packed 
house in the Elizabeth Hall Auditorium. A 
dance was held at the Holiday Inn, with Ron 
Piccolo and Pearl Ashcraft being crowned 
the homecoming royalty. Saturday's events 
included the traditional picnic in the Forest 
ofArden, and the Hatter Howl pep rally that 
evening. A free concert by Information Soci- 
ety, along with a bonfire, the Velcro Wall, 
and the gyro machine got the students 
psyched before the basketball game. The 
Hatters went up against the Lions of South- 
eastern Louisiana University. 

This year's homecoming saw students tak- 
ing a more active role in all events, and they 
had an opportunity to unite with alumni. No 
one wanted to say goodbye to the great week- 
end! 



The velcro wall had 
people doing flips 
because they were 
having so much fun. 




76 CAMPUS LIFE 



Adam Sandler offered comic relief 
during homecoming. He performed 
to a packed auditorium. 




HOMECOMING 77 




78 CAMPUS LIFE 




The Mad Hatter makes one of his 
final guest appearances. A new 
mascot is being developed to better 
represent the Stetson Community. 



Tim Haggard, Paul Battingtin, 
Chris Hopkins, and Matt Stone 
play for the audience at Hatter 
Howl. 




HOMECOMING 79 



Chalk art during Greenfeather 
allows the organizations to 
express themselves. 




80 CAMPUS LIFE 








ETTING 

INVOLVED 

WITH 

GREENFEATHER 



Greenfeather Week is a week in 

which student organizations and 

other student groups compete to 

raise money. Greenfeather is a 

week in which students, faculty, 

and staff come together in the name 

of charity. School spirit definitely shines 

through in each of the activities open to the 

Stetson community. 

Mr. Beauty, Ms. Greenfeather, the 
Olympic event, chalk art, and the rock-a- 
thon are events in which each group picks a 
student or several students to represent 
there organization or group. The winners 
are the people with the most spirit or the best 
fund raising abilities. 

Greenfeather is a week in which everyone 
shows their pride in Stetson. 
HATS OFF TO FUND RAISING FOR 
CHARITY. 



GREENFEATHER 81 



The chalk art event is one of the 
activities during Greenfeather. 





The chalk art event brings various groups 
together to show off their spirit and creativ- 
ity. 




82 CAMPUS LIFE 







Campaign 

October 17-24 




83 



Darald Stubbs drives the tractor for the hay ride at 
Harvestfest. 

Andrew Dare and Angela Paumier at Harvestfest. 




84 CAMPUS LIFE 




ARVEST 
FEST 



II 

^^M ^^M This year the Student Life 

^^M ^^M Office began a new event on 

^^M ^^P campus, Harvestfest. 

if^^h jjjjjjjj^^Bl Harvestfest was an event 

open to students, faculty, and 
staff during the fall. The day long event 
^P^ consisted of a picnic, an arts and crafts 
&■ sale, a hay ride, and various booths with 
» vendors and activities for everyone to 

^1 All in all the day was a fun filled event 

for everyone. 



The hay ride was 
open to anyone who 
attended harvest- 
fest. 



HARVESTFEST 85 



VISIT 

FROM 

JIMMY 



A 

I ^H On Monday, October 26, 1993 

M^ ^^^^^ Stetson welcomed former President 

^Hi I^^HH Jimmy 

Carter. Carter has been an active 
member of Habitat For Humanity since his 
time out of office. 

During his visit, the 39th President was 
welcomed by 600 students, faculty, and staff 
during an open discussion session, held in 
the EUzabeth Hall Auditorium. During a 
reception, which foUowed the discussion ses- 
sion. Carter was greeted by 300 people, pri- 
marily volunteer organizations on campus, 
at the Carlton Union Building. The recep- 
tion showcased 21 service organizations 
which serve the Stetson Community as weU 
as the surrounding community. Organiza- 
tions such as Youth Advocating Planitary 
Improvement, Habitat For Humanity, Into 
The Streets, Youth Motivators, Amnesty 
International, Circle K International, 
Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Peer Educators, Stu- 
dent Ambassadors, BACCUS, and Students 
Against Sexual Assault. 

The capstone of Carters visit was his 
speech at the Edmunds Center. The former 
President^ visit was sponsored by Stetson's 
Institute for Christian Ethics as part of the 
James A. Stewart Lecture Series. 



Gayle Littleton and 
President Doug Lee 
welcomed the former 
President, Jimmy 
Carter. 




86 CAMPUS LIFE 



Carter 




JIMMY CARTER 87 



Intervarsity Christian Fellowship set up a table at the 
reception for former president Jimmy Carter. 

President and Mrs. Lee along with Gayle Littleton 
greeted Carter upon his arrival at Stetson. 




88 CAMPUS LIFE 




Abby Loreto tells Carter about 
Student Ambassadors. 



During the reception held for 
President Carter, over 300 stu- 
dents, faculty, and staff attended. 




JIMMY CARTER 89 



Student ambassadors introduce 
all incoming students to Stet- 
son. 




Carmen Hendricks and Braber wait for 
their tour groups to arrive. 





90 CAMPUS LIFE 




TUDENT 

AMBASSADORS 

SPREAD 

GOODWILL 



s 

^^^^ ^ The Student Ambassadors are 

^^^^^^^^r ^ select group of volunteer Stet 
son students who assist the 
administration office with the recruitment 
of prospective students. We work hand- 
in-hand with Dean Glover and the admis- 
sions staff to promote the type of high 
quality image that is characteristic of our 
students to those students who are in the 
process of applying to colleges. 

Not only are we Stetson's goodwill rep- 
resentatives, but we are also the student's 
most important contact. We give campus 
tours and provide these prospective stu- 
dents with the inside, perhaps uncen- 
sored, description of life here at Stetson 
which will help students learn how they 
can reach special academic and personal 
goals and prepare for the future. 

Throughout the course of the year, stu- 
dent ambassadors are also involved in 
organizing such things as Summer Fresh- 
man Orientation, Parent's Weekend, 
Spring Open House and phonathons to 
prospective students. It is our job to orga- 
nize seminars, schedule campus tours and 
to promote school spirit. These different 
activities gave us a chance to give back to 
Stetson all that it has given to us. 



Abby Loreto takes a 
break between tours 
to talk to other 
ambassadors. 



STUDENT AMBASSADORS 91 



The Student Ambassadors sit down and relax after a 
long day. 

Dean Glover meets with a group of potential students 
and their parents before the Student Ambassadors 
begin their tours. 




92 CAMPUS LIFE 



~~11 





The Student Ambassadors give 
walking tours of Stetson's build- 
ings and the whole campus. 




STUDENT AMBASSADORS 93 



ULE 

LOG 
LIGHTING 



Y 

^^^^^^^ Every year, for the past 54 

^^^^^^^ years, Stetson University has 

marked the beginning of the holiday sea- 
son with the ceremonious lighting of the 
yule log. Sponsored by Religious life 
council, the ceremony takes place at the 
base ofHulley Tower; there are scripture 
readings, Christmas Concert, caroling, 
the playing of the bells in Hulley Tower, 
the lighting of the Christmas Tree, and a 
candelight walk to Holler Fountain. 

The lighting of the yule log is a tradi- 
tion which spread from an old English 
tradition that, at one time, consisted of 
the women's residence halls lighting can- 
dles in the windows of each room. Today, 
the lighting takes place outside for any- 
one who chose to attend. 

The lighting of the yule log marks the 
beginning of the holiday season and the 
end of the year. It is said to bring good 
luck to everyone who attends. As a sym- 
bolic casting away of the past year, mem- 
bers of the audience are invited to throw 
twigs on the fire. 



Michelle Benson 
attends the Yule 
Log lighting. 




94 CAMPUS LIFE 





The people that attend the Yule Log light- 
ing are invited to throw twigs onto the fire. 

Christmas Caroles and Scripture reading a 
part of the traditional Yule Log ceremony. 



YULE LOG 95 



^ "-'^-lilV 




NTO 

THE 

STREETS 



Into The Streets (ITS) is Stet- 
son's volunteer coalition. It is a 
network of Circle K, YAPI, 
Habitat for Humanity, Resident 
Hall Liaisons and an executive 
committee that promotes, sup- 
ports, and enhances student involvement in 
community service. We organize special one- 
day campus-wide service events like Head- 
Start Field Day and the CPR Rally. ITS 
crosses all institutional and cultural lines 
and encourages everyone to listen to each 
other and reach out to the community. 

Since our beginning in 1991, we have 
grown from a core of seven dedicated mem- 
bers to a full grown volunteer coalition that 
reaches hundreds of Stetson students and cit- 
izens of the DeLand community. AU of our 
members are "seeds of service." They came 
to plant a positive image of life wherever they 
volunteer. 

Through the support ofHoUis Leadership 
and Campus Life, we now have an office. 
The Into The Streets office is the central net- 
working center for volunteer opportunities 
at Stetson University and in the DeLand 
community. 

Stetson students are leading the way in 
addressing social problems. We are building 
a society in which all people can Uve with dig- 
nity and respect. 



Alpha Chi Omega at 
"Have a Heart" Day. 
Barbarade la Fe, 
Kristie March, Kris- 
ten Moody with the 
Sugar and Spice 
Kids. 



96 CAMPUS LIFE 





"*'™*i 



0^ 




Tanya Blair says, "Community outreach is 
#1". SGA and Into the Street member Jane 
Fleming went to Miami to deliver toys and 
love to children at the South Dade Migrant 
Camp. 



Chris Hoy and Jane Flemming at the CPR 
rally. 



INTO THE STREETS 97 




Michelle O'Lear and Donnie Hitchcock next 
to their chalk art. 



98 CAMPUS LIFE 



TUDENTS 

TRANSCENDING 
HOMOPHOBIA 



s 

^k m tudents Transcending Homophobia 

^^^ M is a group dedicated to challenging 

^r^^^^^F the prevailing notions about sexual 
^^^^ orientation. 

Within a month and a half of receiving offi- 
cial recognition as a student organization, 
STH reached more goals than anyone expect- 
ed. Carefully planned meetings with adminis- 
trators and dedicated leaders were all part of 
STH's strategy for success. Our information 
tables and campaign for an equal opportunity 
statement encouraged dialogue and promoted 
intellectual challenges at all levels throughout 
the Stetson community. At the '93 Campus Life 
Awards ceremony, STH won the award for 
Most Active Organization and Most Spirited 
Organization on campus. 

Leaders for the 93-94 academic year, many 
of whom attended the '93 March on Washing- 
ton and Student Conferences for gay equal 
rights, are enthusiastic about the future of 
Students Transcending Homophobia. We look 
forward to a day when all students can truly 
respect one another. We believe, however, that 
all of us must first understand who we truly 
are from an inclusive perspective. 



Vy Trab meets other 
Asians at the gay 
rights movement 
while at a confer- 
ence in D. C. 



STVD. TRANSCENDING HOMOPHOBIA 99 








LIZ MAURER — ENGLAND 



top picture: Liz, Paige, Knaebel watch a cricket match 
at the Trent Bridge Grounds, Nottingham, 
middle picture: Liz and Maggie run into American 
friends on O'Connell Street, Dubhn. 



The year I spent at the university in Nottingham, Eng- 
land was the best and most important year in my life. At 
first I had decided to go only for the Spring 1992 semes- 
ter, but after being therefor less than a month, I knew I 
wanted to stay. Going back for a new year, after already 
having been there, was quite an exciting feeling, as I was 
the only returning American student. By December this 
year I had become so accustomed to the British lifestyle, 
that I almost had forgotten I was a foreigner. We were 
given plenty of time to travel, especially during the 5 
week Spring Holiday. I traveled to many beautiful 
places — cities and villages all over England, as well as 
to Scotland, Northen Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, 
Wales, France, Italy, and Greece, but no matter where I H 
went I was always glad to return to my cozy room in Not- 
tingham. My life in England was incredible and in fact 
has shaped my future; I plan to return to England in 
October 1994 to get my Masters degree. I encourage all 
of those who can, to study abroad at any universities 
that Stetson offers; you make great friends from all over 
the world and you 'II never again have an experience like 
it. 





100 CAMPUS LIFE 



NIKKI SALAMONE 
— FRANCE 

My semester abroad was a tremendous 
ransition period to the culture, the lan- 
guage, international expectations, stereo- 
ypes, and the like. The study abroad stu- 
ients at the University of Borgogne, Dijon 
vere myself, Erin Carmichael, Lisa Cotton, 
i^irginia Dyer, Kelle Edwards, Laurie Fore- 
nan, Amy Oke, and Stephanie Taylor. From 
he wine caves ofBeaune to the city of Lights, 
rom outrageous Amsterdam to war-stricken 
Germany, from the salt mines of Salzburg 
and the Sound of Music) to the canals of 
Venice and the Danube River in Czechoslova- 



left: A Stetson excursion to a Chateau in the Lorie Valley, right: Erin, 
Nikki, Laurie, and Lisa on a Canal Boat tour of Amsterdam, bottom: 
at the International Foyer students stajdng for the year made a last 
dinner together. 

kia and Hungary, from the rolling hills in Ire- 
land to the Islands of Greece, from the Stet- 
son sponsored excursions to museums in 
Paris and the Chateaux of both the Lorie Val- 
ley and of Bourgogne ; Europe conquered our 
feet and conquered our hearts. 

I felt the ultimate freedom of the world and 
learned to appreciate my own country: I 
became patriotic, I became international, I 
became myself. 

Now that I am back at Stetson, I appreci- 
ate more and more my memories and experi- 
ences in Dijon and the rest of Europe. 








STUDY ABROAD 101 



6 



U 
D 
Y 



MICHELE SURPRENANT 
— SPAIN 

The best experience of my life was going to live in Madrid. 
What's so great about Uving outside of the U. S. ? It is that 
you learn about yourself and you learn to avoid the stereo- 
typing of other people and cultures. I never reaUzed how 
much of what I do, I do because Vm American. Spaniards 



and other Europeans ivays of life are really dif- 
ferent from ours, from the simplest things as 
dancing or ordering food in a restaurant to 
more complex things as their university system. 
Spain is a beautiful country full of fin, open- 
minded and far-out people. I can recommend a 
semester or a year abroad to any student who 
wants an adventure of a Ufe time. I don't regret 
one single day there! After graduation I'm 
going back. 




PAIGE KNAEBEL — 
ENGLAND 

The experience of a lifetime was being able to study in 
Nottingham, England. Nothing could compare to the 
adventures and memories I would gather during my 
stay. 

While in Nottingham, I met many wonderful people. 
We all have many memories of Monday nights in The 
Bell, or days spent in the Arboretum Park. There seemed 
to be something new and different everyday. 

On weekends we were able to travel. Our travels 
included excursions to Scotland, Ireland, and travels 
through Great Britain. During the five week break, 
travels took us to Europe. We were able to travel via 
train and boat from Amsterdam all the way down to 
Greece. What an experience to live out of a backpack for 
over a month! 

My experience while abroad is hard to sum up on one 
page. The most important aspect of my travels was the 
independence and determination I gained while abroad. 
I feel the semester in England changed everyone. We all 
came back different people with memories to last a life- 
time. 



left: American students getting some sights in on the 
weekend — London, right: A group of Stetson students 
beginning their journey — the arrival at Nottingham, 
bottom: Stetson students with friends at the Bell in 
Nottingham City Centre. 




102 CAMPUS LIFE 



top: Michele vacationing with friends from Spain, left: 
last night out before returning home, right: Moscow 
State U. main building, bottom left: Stetson students in 
St. Petersburg. 



KAREN LAZAR — RUSSIA 





'?fei|^,, ^ 




Although Stetson has given me 
many opportunities since I was a 
freshman, the most beneficial 
and extraordinary has been the 
chance to study abroad in 
Moscow, Russia. As a Russian 
Studies Major, I prepared for 
two years to go and sometimes it 
seemed as though I would never 
get there. Then September 
arrived and I was on an airplane 
headed for Russia. 

Looking back, all of us recall 
being stranded in the Moscow 
airport, Jason being attacked by 
a Russian police officer, Muffy 
and Jason being robbed on 
Thanksgiving, Lynn slipping on 
the ice, Eric and Marissa bicker- 
ing, Elissa and her enormous 
bags filled with food from the 
Irish House (A supermarket), 
Kelly hoping to hold on to her 
upbeat disposition, and me, well 
what can I say, those who were 
with my know my escapades! 



^ 




A 

O 

A 
D 



rt^^ 




V. . 








ULTI- 

CULTURAL 
DIVERSITY 



This year the Stetson Community dedicat- 
ed itself to Multicultural Diversity. In an 
attempt to enlighten and educate people 
about various ethnic groups. This year 
Black Awareness Week offered students var- 
ious activities to attend. There were several 
films shown in the student lounge of the 
CUB; group discussions followed the films. 
Outside activities and events accompanied 
the films and discussions to create an 
awareness and an interest with the student, 
faculty, and staff. 

Stetson's African-American Student 

Union sponsored a Gospel Extravaganza in 

which featured guests, Bethune-Cookman 

College Gospel Choir, performed with the 

Greater Union Baptist Church Choir, Mt. 

Calvary Freeivill Baptist Choir, Antioch 

Freewill Baptist Church Choir, DeLeon 

Springs Church of God Gospel Choir, in 

Elizabeth Hall Auditorium, for the DeLand 

and Stetson Communities. 

Multicultural Diversity is an important 

part of Stetson's future. This year aware- 
ness and diversity weeks included: Diversity 
Week, Human Civil Rights Week, Hispanic 
Week, Asian Week, Native American Week, 
and Women's Issues Week. HATS OFF TO 
STETSON DIVERSITY! 



Guest speaker 
Patricia Ireland 
spoke at Stetson 
during Women's 
Issues Week. 




^^^^I^^B ^^H 






F^^liiii m 



.d^fglUlJip^. 



104 CAMPUS LIFE 



Rick Whitted acted as a speaker 
during the Gospel Extravagan- 




MULTICULTVK4L DIVERSITY 105 




UN 

SPLASH 



One of the most enjoyable events for 
the Stetson community is Sun Splash. The 
all day event is in its second year, and 
was originally intended to be a day of sun 
and fun for everyone interested. At Sun 
Splash, you could play volleyball, try out 
the Virtual Reality Machine, catch some 
rays, listen to the great bands who per- 
formed, or check out the various items 
the vendors had on hand. 

Another great event which began this 
year was The Last Splash Bash. Held 
near the end of the semester (before 
finals), this last bash was an afternoon of 
fun before the end of school. The splash 
part of the bash began at Rinker Field 
with a huge water fight. As the bash con- 
tinued, the crowd was able to try out the 
Virtual Reality Machine or head to the 
Pit where the band Big Wide World per- 
formed for students, faculty, and staff. 
Both of these events give the entire Stet- 
son community the chance to cut loose 
and have a good time during the fast pace 
of the school year. 



The Virtual Reality 
Machine was free to 
anyone who attend- 
ed Sun Splash or 
the Last Splash 
Bash. 




106 CAMPUS LIFE 



Various venders set up booths 
Throughout the day people and offered "rasta" items for the 
could be seen sun bathing. right price. 




SUN SPLASH 107 




108 CAMPUS LIFE 





Volleyball proved to be a popu- 
lar sport among the Sun Splash 
visitors. 



Various vendors set up booths 
around Rinker Field. 



SUN SPLASH 109 



HE 



BEST 

FITTING 
CAP OF ALL! 



T 

^H On May 16, 1993, Stetson 

^^H seniors gathered for one of the 

^^H most important events of their 

^^^^^^^ lii'es, graduation. The day 

Hl^^^^" began with baccalaureate. Dr. 

Clyde Fant and O. L. Walker 
spoke at the service. Brunch followed bac- 
calaureate for all Stetson students and their 
families. The commencement exercises 
began at 1 :30. 
Pearl Ashcraft and Adam Forrand gave the 
students speeches at commencement. Pearl 
speech, about good times and good friends, 
touched at the heart strings of the audience 
and brought smiles and nod from the seniors 
who sat in anxious anticipation of their 
diplomas. Adam, in his speech, reminded 
the seniors of the importance of risk taking. 
He stressed the risked taken when leaving 
for college and the risks to be encountered 

afterward. 
The speaker for the 1993 graduation cere- 
mony was David Broder, a national political 
columnist for the Washington Post. He was 
given an honorary doctor of law degree at 
commencement. 
The 1993 winner of the McEniry award for 
excellence in teaching was given to Dr. 
Wayne Dickson. He was presented the 
award by his friend and colleague Dr. 
Michael Raymond. 



Dr. Dickson receives 
the McEniry Award 
from his colleague Dr. 
Raymond. 



110 CAMPUS LIFE 





Dr. Louis Brakeman, President 
Lee, and commencement speak- 
er David Broder. 





! 






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The 


commencement exercises 


began 


with 


the 


singing of the school song. 








GRADUATION 


111 



STETSON 
RETIREES 

FOR 
1992-1993 



This year nine members 
of the Stetson community 
announced retirement at 
the end of this academic 
year. The retiring faculty 
and staff members include: 
Provost Dr. Louis Brake- 
man, Dr. Ruth Arnold. Lois 
Ann Hanson, Janice Hay 



ton, Paul R. Jenkins, Dr. 
Francis Knapp, Dr. Paul 
Langston, Professor Max- 
ine Patterson, and Dorothy 
Smith. Dr. Malcolm Wynn 
announced that he would 
take active senior status for 
the fall of 1993. 





112 CAMPUS LIFE 




Page 112 Top: Dr. Ruth 
Arnold, Professor of Educa- 
tion and 1947 honor gradu- 
ate of Stetson, who devel- 
oped and directed the uni- 
versity's exceptional student 
education program. 

Page 112 Bottom Left: Dr. 
Paul Langston, dean of the 
School of Music for 22 years 
and Kenan Professor of 
Church Music. He was 1991 
recipient of McEniry Award 
for excellence in teaching. 

Page 112 Bottom Right: 
Paul R. Jenkins, Jr. Univer- 
sity Organist and member of 
the music school faculty for 
37 years and former profes- 
sor of organ and chair of the 
Studio Division. 

Page 113 Top: Provost 
Louis Brakeman. 

Page 113 Bottom: Dr. 
William W. Wright. Other 
Retirees: Assistant Regis- 
trar Lois Ann Hanson, mem- 
ber of the Stetson since 1979. 




Dr. Francis Knapp, profes- 
sor and former chair of biol- 
ogy and former chair of 
Faculty Senate. He was one 
of the original members of 
the St. Johns River Water 
Management District and 
assisted with biology depart- 
ment studies on Spruce 
Creek and Mosquito 
Lagoon. Professor Maxine 
Patteron, who began at 
Stetson in 1948 teaching sec- 
retarial science. She helped 
develop and implement Win- 
ter Term and summer busi- 
ness interships and served 
on a variety of university 
committees and as a member 
of the Faculty Senate. 
Dorothy Smith, former 
switchboard operator and a 
member of Stetson for 10 
years. Dr. Malcolm Wynn, 
member of the History 
department for 40 years. He 
begins the fall semester on 
senior active status. 



RETIRING FACULTY AND STAFF 113 



STETSON UNIVERSITY 

PRESIDENT 

DOUG LEE 




114 



On January 20, 1993, William 
Jefferson Clinton took the oath 

of office and became the 42nd 
president of the United States. 



Carl Lewis may 

not make it to 

the next 

Olympics — 

he'll be 35 by 

then — but he 

won two gold 

medals this 

time, one for 

the long jump 

and one in the 

400-meter 

relay. 

There she is, 
Miss America. 
Leanza Cornett, 
21, of Jack- 
sonville, Flori- 
da, was the 
66th Miss 
America chosen 
by a panel of 
celebrity 
judges. She is a 
sophomore 
studying com- 
munications at 
Rollins College 
in Winter Park, 
Florida. She 
said that she 
plans to speak 
about AIDS 
awareness dur- 
ing her year- 
long reign. 




116 CURRENT EVENTS 






URRENT 

EVENTS 



1992 WAS AN 
EXCITING 
YEAR FOR THE 
U.S. PEOPLE 



The World was on edge as 1992 ended and 1993 began. 
From the crowning of Leanza Cornet as Miss America 
to Carl Lewis winning two gold medals at the 
Olympics, it was a year of 
anticipation and rejoice. 
From the Presidential cam- 
paign, which turned into a three ringed cir- 
cus, to civil wars which seemed to reach 
around the globe, 1992 was an exciting and 
vortical year. 

The United States sent troops to intervene 
in the war torn country of Somalia, in hopes 
of creating peace and ending the ethnic cleansing and starvation the 
people were facing. It was also the year that a Democrat — Bill Clin- 
ton — would be elected to the office of President for the first time in 
twelve years and voter turn out was at an all time high. Voting lines 
in Central Florida were sometimes two and three hours long. Amer- 
ican politics and politicians have always demanded attention but 
after a week of rioting, looting and basic civil unrest in Southern 
California voters had to speak up. The backlash after the not guilty 
verdict in the Rodney King beating trial left us asking our leaders for 
answers. 

This was a year for Americans to get involved State and Locally, 
and for America to get more involved Nationally. As the year 1993 
progresses we are left wondering what will happen next 



CURRENT EVENTS 117 



Ethel Carpenter was honored dur- 
ing homecoming for being one of 
Stetson oldest living alumni. 




Beatrice Berry 




J 18 CURRENT EVENTS 




Paul Dascher 



CURRENT EVENTS 119 



Bill Clinton stepped into the 
national spotlight and won the 
nomination at the Democratic 
National Convention in a hot 
July week in New York City. 
Clinton, a fonner Rhodes Schol- 
ar at Oxford University and a 
graduate of Yale Law School, 
ivas governor of Arkansas when 
he decided to enter the national 
race. As his running mate, he 
chose Al Gore, who ivas elected 
to the House of Representatives 
at the age of 28 in his first cam- 
paign for public office. He ivas 
elected to the Senate House in 
1984. 




Bush kept Qtiayle as his nm- 
ning mate in 1992. The tivo 
arrived at the GOP convention 
Houston (and left) as underdogs 
to the Clinton/Gore ticket. Dur- 
ing the GOP convention, the 
impression the Bush strategists 
sought to convey ivas that the 
president was the true agent of 
change and that Clinton was 
slick and unreliable. For the 
Democrats, the economy — and 
Bush's perceived mishandling of 
it — remained the main message 
that they hammered again and 
again. After the Democratic 
Convention in New York City, 
the Clinton/Gore ticket was far 
ahead in the polls. 



On the Republican side. First 
Lady Barbara Bush has been 
standing by her husband since 
they were married in 1945. She is 
the mother of five children. One 
of her sons, ]eb, once said: "Dad 
was the chief executive officer, 
but mother ivas the chief operat- 
ing officer. We all reported to 
her." Marilyn Quayle is the 
quintessential suburban mother 
involved in PTA, Little League 
and school plays. 



Ross Perot made his first billion 

when the computer company he 

founded began selling stock. His 

presidential candidacy came to a 

stop when he abruptly quit the race 

in July. Tlien he got back into the 

race with about five weeks to go 

before Election Day. As his running 

mate, he chose James Stockdale, 68, 

a highly decorated former Navy 

fighter pilot and POW. Spending 

millions of dollars of his own 

money and relying on an army of 

"volunteers," the Perot campaign 

was off and running. It included a 

spot in the presidential debates 

that were held in October. 






The wives of the Democratic can- 
didates, Hilary Clinton and Tipper 
Gore, were very active in the cam- 
paign — Mrs. Clinton, a tough- 
minded lawyer. Tipper Gore, a cru- 
sader for warning labels on albums 
with explicit lyrics. Both women 
were tireless campaigners for the 
Clinton/Gore ticket. 




120 WORLD EVENT 




Civil war spread across 
Yugoslavia, a nation of six 
republics and two provinces that 
had been plagued for centuries by 
historic ethnic, religious and eco- 
nomic differences. Nationalists, 
Anti-Communist parties won elec- 
tions in 1991 in all republics except 
Serbia, the largest, and Montene- 
gro. Then Croatia and its neighbor 
Slovenia declared their indepen- 
dence. Traditional rivalries were 
strongest betiveen the 9 million 
Serbs, who belong to the Orthodox 
church, and the 5 million Croats, 
who are Roman Catholic. Tens of 
thousands of people became 
refugees and the killitig continued. 





The United States Marines 
arrived in Somalia on December 9, 
1992. The starving African country 
ravaged by famine and widespread 
looting of food from international 
relief agencies. The Marines offered 
a security force to insure safe food 
distribution. 



Serbian soldiers entered 
Bosnia and began killing Mus- 
lims. The ivar which has contin- 
ued for over a year, began the 
process of ethnic cleansing. 

Muslims were leaving Bosnia 
2000 at a time, on vehicles 
designed to carry only 650. Dur- 
ing their flight several people 
were crushed to death in their 
hope for a more peaceful life. 




When Rodney King was 
stopped by police on a Los Ange- 
les freeway, police say he resist- 
ed them and was beaten. Some- 
one videotaped the melee and 
released the tape to local televi- 
sion stations. It received nation- 
al attention, and four white offi- 
cers were charged in the beating 
of King, who was black. But 
when a jury found them innocent 
of any wrong-doing, three days 
of rioting hit Los Angeles. When 
it ended, 52 people were dead, 2, 
383 were injured, 18, 807 were 
arrested, and the amount of 
property damage was estimated 
at $785 million. 




United States and allied air- 
craft attacked strategic targets 
in Iraq in early January. Jlie 
first attack hit a nuclear com- 
plex near the capital city of 
Baghdad, followed by other 
strategic hits on Iraqi missile 
sites. Many of the U. S. aircraft 
that flew raids over Iraq were 
based on the USS Kitty Hawk. 



WORLD EVENTS 121 



BESTSELLERS/PAPERBACK — SEPTEMBER 1992 


FICTION 


NONFICTION 


l.TTieFirm 


1. United We stand 


by John Grisham 


by Ross Perot 


2. A Time to Kill 


2. Life's Little Instruction 


by John Grisham 


Book 


3. Night Over Water 


3. 7 Habits of Highly Effec- 


by Ken FoUett 


tive People 


4. No Greater Love 


4. Fried Green Tomatoes 


by Danielle Steel 


5. America: What Went 


5. The Sum of All Fears 


Wrong? 


by Tom Clancy 


by Barlett & Steel 



When George Bush's campaign 
for the presidency began to fal- 
ter, he turned to his longtime 
friend James A. Baker III for 
help. Baker took leave for his 
duties as Secretary of State and 
joined the re-election campaign 
to get it hack on track. Baker 
was repeating the role he 
performed in 1988, when he quit 
as President Reagan's treasury 
secretary to run then-Vice Presi- 
dent Bush's campaign. He trav- 
els with the President, prefer- 
ring to stage-manage events 
from the White House. Now, as 
then, he is looking to manage a 
come-from-behind victory. 



BESTSELLERS/PAPERBACK— SEPTEMBER 1992 


FICTION 


NONFICTION 


6. The Novel 


6. Tlie Indispensable 


by James Michener 


Calvin and Hobbes 


7. The Cat Who Moved 


by BUI Watterson 


by Lilian Jackson 


7. A Hiousand Acres 


Brown 


by Jane Smiley 


8. Outer Banks 


8. Daisy Fay and the 


by Anne Rivers 


Miracle Man 


Siddons 


by Fannie Flagg 


9. Saint Maybe 


9. Disappearing Acts 


by Anne Tyler 


by Terry McMillan 


10. Needful Things 


10. Government Rackets: 


by Stephen King 


Washington Watse from 




AtoZ 



Itszak Rabin, Israel's prime 
minister, was chief of staff 
when the army captured the 
West Bank and Gaza strip 25 
years ago. The 70-year-old 
Rabin was premier from 1974- 
77. In a speech to Parliament 
not long after his June election, 
he let it be known that Israel 
had a new boss with a hard- 
nosed approach to Middle East 
peacemaking. Rabin said he 
wanted peace, and as part of 
that goal, he stressed the impor- 
tance of stopping the spread of 
nuclear weapons in that part of 
the world. It was one more rea- 
son, he said, "for the urgent 
need to end the 
Arab-Israeli conflict. 





In early 1992, Boutros Boutros- 
Ghali became the world's top 
diplomat — the Secretary Gen- 
eral of the United Nations. The 
former Egyptian deputy prime 
minister quickly earned high 
marks for firmness and new 
ideas. The 69-year-old diplomat 
was chosen by the Security 
Council as a transitional com- 
promise figure and is expected 
to serve only one five-year term. 




122 WORLD EVENTS 



^1 




In 1991 Boris Yeltsin was 
elected president of the Russian 
Federation. One of his top pri- 
orities was economic reform. 
But the gloomy economic condi- 
tions reflected the grave diffi- 
culties he and his government 
faced trying to build a market 
economy on the ruins of the 
failed Soviet Communist Sys- 
tem. While attempting to estab- 
lish economic and political ties 
abroad, Yeltsin's reforms at 
home increased prices by as 
much as 1,500 percent during the 
first part of 1992. Many Rus- 
sians felt that the reforms had 
damaged their living standards 
significantly. 




Saddam Hussein is alive and 
well and living in Baghdad — at 
least by most accounts. The 
Mideast War ended in February, 
1991. Since that day. President 
Bush has urged the downfall of 
the 55-year-old leader. But with- 
in Iraq, Saddam Hussein appears 
to have only grown stronger 
since his troops were forced out 
of Kuwait. However, he lives 
under a constant threat of death 
by Iraqi opposition leaders and 
a host of other enemies. It was 
because of this fear of assassina- 
tion that he reorganized his per- 
sonal bodyguard corps and 
appointed his young son, Qusai, 
as chief of presidential security. 



BESTSELLERS/HARDCOVER — SEPTEMBER 1992 


FICTION 


NOIICTION 


1. Waiting to Exhale 


1. The Way Things 


by Terry McMillan 


Ought to Be 


2. The Pelican Brief 


By Rush Limbaugh 


by John Grisham 


2. The Silent Passage 


3. Where is Joe Merchant 


by Gail Sheehy 


by Jimmy Buffet 


3. Every Living Thing 


4. Gerald's Game 


by James Herriot 


by Stephen King 


4. Truman 


5. All That Remains 


by D. McCullough 


by Patricia D. Comwell 


5. The Last Tsar: The 




Life and Death of 




Nicholas II 




by Edvard Radinslty 



Pope John Paul II underwent 
colon surgery in the summer of 
1992 to remove a benign tumor. 
The 72-year-old Pontiff was 
hospitalized for about 10 days. 
The Pope had aggressively 
wielded the Vatican's influence 
in the secular world — from 
assisting in peace efforts to 
helping topple communism in 
his native Poland and across 
eastern Europe. In 1978 he 
became the first non-Italian 
pope in 455 years. 



BESTSELLERS/HARDCOVER 


—SEPTEMBER 1992 


FICTION 


NONFICTION 


6. The Secret History 


6. Earth in the Balance 


by Donna Tartt 


by Al Gore 


7. The Volcano Lover 


7. Women Who Run 


by Susan Sontag 


With the Wolves 


8. Possessing the Secret 


by Clarissa Pinkola 


of Joy 


Estes 


by Alice Walker 


8. Young Men and Fire 


9. Tangled Vines 


by Norman Maclean 


by Janet Dalley 


9. The Te of Piglet 


10. The Bridges of Madison 


by Benjamin Hoff 


County 


10. A Return to Love 


by Robert James 


by M. Williamson 


Waller 





WORLD EVENTS 123 



Barcelona, Spain, hosted 
the summer Olympics in 1992 
and it proved to be a bonan- 
za for the United States — a 
total of 108 medals. A record 
10,000 athletes, professional 
and amateurs, from 183 coun- 
tries gathered in this rapidly 
modernized metropolis nes- 
tled between the mountains 
and the Mediterranean Sea. 
In the diving competitions, 
Mary Ellen Clark won the 
bronze metal from the 10 
meter platform. 




Basketball great Larry Bird 
retired from the Boston Celtics 
after a 13-year career. "When I 
played, I played as hard as I 
could. That's what I want to be 
remembered for." Tlte 35-year- 
old Bird was plagued by back 
problems for the last two sea- 
sons of his career. His brillant 
passing, pinpoint shooting and 
rebounding made him the 
consummate team player. 




Hurricane Iniki dealt a direct 
blow to part of the Hawaiian 
Islands in September. Winds 
gusting up to 160 mph and tor- 
rential rain hit Kauai Island, 
causing enormous damage. It 
was the most powerful hurri- 
canes to hit the Hawaiian 
Islands this century. Twenty- 
foot waves crashed over coastal 
highways and the island lost all 
power and telephone service 
even before the worst of the 
storm hit. Oahu, the state's 
most populated island with 
800,000 people, is separated 
from Kauai by an 80-mile 
channel and was spared the 
brunt of the storm. 




Clear cutting was one of 
clearing timber that the envi- 
ronmentalists wanted to 
eliminate in 1992 and 1993. 
Environmental groups want 
to protect the prime sanctu- 
ary for many threatened 
species. 




America needs to recycle. And 
America also needs to use recy- 
cled products. Recycling has 
produced vast supplies of paper, 
glass and other reusable trash, 
but not enough demand. A busi- 
ness alliance for the National 
Recycling Coalition is cam- 
paigning to encourage small 
and large business to commit 
themselves to buy recycled 
products. 




124 WORLD EVENTS 




Hurricane Andrew carved its 
way through the Bahamas and 
hit South Florida with a power- 
house intensity before moving 
into Louisiana. It was a har- 
rowing time, as tens of thou- 
sands of people tried to evacu- 
ate the Miami area and thou- 
sands more rode out the storm 
in shelters and boarded up 
homes. 




A oil tanker carrying near- 
ly 25 million gallons of crude 
oil lost power and was 
blown onto the rugged coast- 
line of the Bay of Quendale, 
100 miles north of Aberdeen, 
Scotland. The 100-island 
Shetlands group in the North 
Sea is sparsely populated but 
abounds with birds, seals, 
fish, and other wildlife. 





Hurricane Andrew's 54-hour 
rampage, the most expensive 
natural disaster ever to hit 
this country, left an estimat- 
ed 180,000 homeless in Florida 
alone. At least 51 deaths 
were directly attributed to 
the storm — 41 in Florida 
and 10 in Louisiana. The 
amount of damage was esti- 
mated at $20 billion in Florida 
and nearly $2 billion in 
Louisiana. 




The Environmental Protec- 
tion Agency issued rules aimed 
at curbing industrial air pollu- 
tion. The new rules outlined 
when businesses must obtain 
state pollution control permits 
under the Clean Air Act. Envi- 
ronmental groups, such as the 
Sierra Club, led the charge 
against polluters. The Clean Air 
Act requires businesses to meet 
new clean air requirements by 
reducing toxic emissions and 
releases that contribute to 
smog. Under the rule, states 
issue pollution control permits 
and the EPA monitors state 
programs to make certain they 
comply with federal rules. 



UMEMPLOYMENT INSU 



fiU 



Unemployment was one of 
the major issues during the 
1992 presidential campaign. 
The unemployment rate had 
risen from 5.2 percent, when 
President Bush took office in 
1988, to over 7 percent on 
Election Day, 1992. That 
meant 9.7 million Americans 
were out of work. And 
according to Labor Depart- 
ment projections, there will 
be 30 percent more college 
graduates than college-level 
jobs from now until the year 
2005. 



WORLD EVENTS 125 



With sales of millions of 
albums, the hard driving rock 
band Cutis N' Roses was a 
heavy-metal phenomena. But 
the group had a tendenaj to get 
a little rowdy during their con- 
certs. At one such event in St. 
Louis, 40 concert-goers and 25 
police officers were injured in a 
melee that erupted after the 
singer Axl Rose leaped from the 
stage to take a catnera from a 
fan and then angrily stormed 
off, abruptly ending the show. 
He was arrested in July, 1992, 
and charged with four misde- 
meanor assault counts. The 
group's latest single, November 
Rain, was at the top of the 
charts in September. 








En Vogue, 




1 . Wayne's World 


also known 




2. Hook 


as the 




3. Terminator 2: Judge- 
ment Day 


"Supremes of 




the 90' s," 


TOP 


4. Rock-A-Doodle 


include Terry 


5. The Great Mouse 


Ellis, Dawn 


10 


Detective 


Robinson, 


6. Ferngully, The Last 


Cindy Her- 


VIDI^O 


Rain Forest 


ron, and 


7. Playboy: Wet&Wild 11 


Maxine 


mm 


8. 101 Dalmations 


Jones. Their 


9. Casablanca: 50th 


rich, layer 




Anniversary Edition 


sound, graces 


mt 


10. The Terminator Twin 


several styles 


Pack 


on "Funky 






Divas," from 






hip hop and 






rhythm and 






blues to rap 






and rock. 



The next Elvis? That's what 
some people are calling Billy 
Ray Cyrus. The 30-year-old 
singer, who dresses in blue 
jeans with the American flag 
on the right rear pocket, hit it 
big with his rollicking single 
"Achy Breaky Heart." He 
combs his long, brown hair 
back into a drooping pony- 
tail, which he ceremoniously 
unties during his perfor- 
mances. His album, "Some 
Gave All," is a blend of coun- 
try, blues, and rock '«' roll. 
He wrote six of the songs, 
including the title song, 
which is a poignant ballad 
that salutes Vietnam Veter- 




""The Red Hot Chili Peppers 
have no preconceived notions; 
lue just do whatever comes out," 
says Drummer Chad Smith. 
What's come out lately is a new 
album, "Blood Sugar Sex 
Majic," which hit the top of the 
charts as soon as it was 
released. The album is the sec- 
ond with the current band mem- 
bers, who formed six months 
after the 1988 death of founding 
guitarist Hillel Slovak and the 
subsequent departure of drum- 
mer Jack Irons. The album fea- 
tures a quieter, more thoughtful 
side of the Chili Peppers. But 
there is still plenty of sonic 
funk. 





Two rappers are turning teen- 
age fashion inside out. The 
trendy new look being popular- 
ized by the duo Kris Kross is to 
wear clothes backward, labels 
out. It's called Kross-dressing. 
Their latest hit record, "Warm 
It Up," steadily inched its way 
up the charts. Kris Kross mem- 
bers Kris Smith and Kris Kelly, 
both 13, wear their clothes 
back-to-front on the cover of 
the album "Totally Krossed 
Out." 




126 CLRREM EVENTS 





Tom Cochran 




Garth Brooks, whose intro- 
spective songs and rousing con- 
certs lifted country music to 
new heights, was voted top 
entertainer by his peers for the 
second year in a row in 1992. 
The 30-year-old superstar man- 
aged to top both the country 
and the pop charts with his 
9-million-sellimg album 
"Ropin' the Wind." The soft 
spoken singer from Oklahoma 
says he spent more time in his 
youth listening to Elton John 
and James Taylor then emulat- 
ing Hank Williams and Merle 
Haggard. 




Mariah Carey, has hit it 
big. Tlie pop vocalist and 
songwriter set the music 
world ablaze in 1990 when 
her debut album was 
released. Featuring the hit 
single "Vision of Love." the 
critics raved about her seven- 
octave vocal range and her 
gospel-toned voice. It eventu- 
ally sold more than seven 
million copies. She writes 
and arranges most of her own 
songs. 



Tom 

Cochrane 

became more 

and more 

popular 

toward the 

end of 1992. 

The pop 

singer made 

it to the 

charts with 

his hit single 

"Life is a 

Highway." 



1. Some Gave All Billy Ray Cyrus 

2. Beyond The Season Garth Brooks 

3. Unplugged Eric Clapton 

4. Ten Pearl Jam 

5. Bobby Bobby Brown 

6. Boomerang Soundtrack 

7. Totally Krossed Out Kris Kross 

8. Temple of the Dog Temple of the Dog 

9. What's the 411 Mary J. BUge 

10. Funky Divas EnVogue 

11. Adrenallzed Def Leppard 

12. The One Elton John 

13. 3 Years 5 Months & 2 Days Arrested Development 

14. House of Pain House of Pain 

15. Countdown to Extinction Megadeth 

16. Blood Sugar Sex Majik Red Hot Chili Peppers 

17. MTV Unplugged EP Mariah Carey 

18. Singles Soundtrack 

19. Ropin' the Wind Garth Brooks 

20. No Fences Garth Brooks 



TOP 

20 



OF 



Rapper Ice-T ignited a furor 
with his song "Cop Killer." Ice- 
Tsaid the controversial song 
was a warning to the Los Ange- 
les police, whom he accused of 
brutality, specifically he was 
referring to the videotaped 
police beating of Rodney King 
and its aftermath of riots. How- 
ever, the singer later removed 
the song from his "Body Count" 
album after law enforcement 
officials and others criticized 
Time Tfor allowing the song to 
be distributed on the company's 
record label. 




Venessa Williams says she 
looks forward to the day 
when a story will be written 
about her that doesn't con- 
tain the words Miss America. 
(Sorry Venessa.) "I think in 
time it will definitely be 
behind me," she said of her 
1984 beauty crown and sub- 
sequent forfeiture because 
of some photos that were 
published of her. The 30-year- 
old entertainer has since 
launched a very successful 
career as an actress and 
singer. 



CURRENT EVENTS 127 




Emily 
Teige, Amy 
Sue Tom- 
linson, and 
Gian Barry 
at Fall Bid 
Day. 



Michelle p 
Richards 



visits the 
Financial 
Aid office. 




128 PEOPLE 






NE 



SIZE FITS 
ALL 

THE FACES BEHIND THE 
NAME... STETSON 

The variety of names and faces 
around campus are what Stet- 
son is all about. Each of our 
personalities, likes, dislikes, 
abilities, successes or failures 
is what makes us individuals. 
However, we are all united on Stetson's 
campus; we help to create the mood and 
the name for Stetson. 

Stetson offers the students , faculty, and 
staff something invaluable — the experi- 
ence of meshing with people we might not 
otherwise have ever met. We effect and 
are affected by everyone we meet during 
our college years. 

As we move from Freshmen to Seniors 
with our heads filled with knowledge and 
our minds opened up to the different 
ways of the world, we have to remember 
our days as Hatters. The Stetson Hat is 
definitely a hat in which ONE SIZE FITS 
ALL! 



Jodi Preti, Laura Palmer, 
and Melanie Rosen at the 
Hatter Howl. 



PEOPLE 129 



Phyllis Arnold 
Continuing Education 



Dr. Wayne Bailey 



Patricia Benson 
Continuing Education 



Sherye Bradley 
A. D. I. S. 



Tom Burke 

Man. Physical Plant 



lop m 



Dr. Everett is a psychology profes- 
sor who brings o feminist perspective 
to her classroom. She is o demand- 
ing professor with "high standards 
and high expectations, but one who 
is fair and very willing to work with 
students. " She wants students to rec- 
ognize that "education isn't just mak- 
ing a living: it's making a life. " 

Dr Everett: "Overall, I act accord- 
ing to the standards of the profes- 
sion, try to live by my principles, and 
turn my sociological lens on every- 
thing. " 





Joyce Deloach 

Asst. Dir. Career Serv. 



Dr. Elizabeth Dershimer Dr. Diane Everett 
Dir. Undergrad Ed. Sociology 



Dr. Jack Fay 
Accounting 



Dr. Bryan Gillespie 
English 



Ben HeHin 

Dept. Envir. Services 




Catherine Irza 
A. D. I. S. 



Valerie Ison 
Dept. Annual Fund 



Nancy Jones 
Dir. Student Life 



130 FACULTY/STAFF 




Dr. Donald Musser Seljuk Nurten 

Relig. / Dir. Honors Prog. Instit. Research 



Dr. Kevin O'Keefe 
History 



Lurch Owen 

Dept. Envir. Services 




lOP w 

Dr. Lucos Is new to Stetson ttiis 
year. He has a strong background In 
history and history of religion. 

Dr Lucas teels that he brings a 
multicultural, global perspective to 
his courses In religion that attempts 
to examine the world's religious tra- 
ditions with empathy, respect, and 
objectivity 

Dr Lucas sees students at Stetson 
as bright, open, and eager to learn. 
Noreen Seacrlst 



Dr. Adrienne Perry 
I^oor. Stud. Teachers 



Deanna Pickens 

Acad. Computer Center 



Dr. Donald Pinnefl 
Education 



James Richter 
Risk Management 




)awn Rodak 

Dir. Career Services 



Charlie Ross 

Dept. Envir. Services 



Angela Russo 
Career Services 



Thomas Shaughnessy 
Acad. Compt. Services 



Stephen Sweeney 
Coor. Inter. Sports 



Dale Tampke 

Dir. Residental Life 




i^ynthia Thorn 
'ubiic Relations 



Sandra Wilcox 
A. D. I. S. 



Jill Woods Dr. James Woodward 

Assoc. Dir. Pub. Relations Dean of Music School 



Dr. Mark Young 
Education 



Arnold - Young 131 



6. 








I 

o 
& 




Ruth M. Aeschleman 
Biology 



Tonia Alyson 
Finance 



Heather Aland 
English 



Annette Aleno 
Psychology 



Christine Amodio 
Gen. Business 



Teri Anderson 
English 



Marc Altobelli 
Political Science 



Dolores J. Armato 
Elementary Education 



James Alvarez 
Finance 




Karen D. Baird 
Elementary Education 




Pearl Ashcraft rests outside the Carlton 
Union Building. 



Robert S. Bates 
Business 



Jennifer Bellomy 
Accounting 



Laura L. Bernal 
Management 



Tanya Lyn Blair 
Education 



132 SENIORS 




Andrea Bleck 
Art 



Roy Allen Bongers 
General Business 



Alberto Borda 
Business Admin. 



Douglas W. Boutwell 
Marketing 



Renee D. Branch 
Music Education 




Tracy Brandenburg 
Psychology 



Mary Faith Brinn 
Elem. Education 



Courtney Brown 
Ad. Marketing 



Ross A. Bunson 
Finance/Invest. 



Laurie Burns 
Accounting 




Deborah Callahan 
Psychology 



Berkeley M. Cano 
Psychology 



Donna Carlson 
Accounting 



Christen Carson 
PsychJSpanish 



AESCHLEMAN-CARSON 133 




Darald Stubbs drives the tractor for the hay 
ride during harvest fast. 



Deborah Cloutier 
English/Philos. 



Jim Coddington 
Finance 



Chris Cominsky 
History 



Michael Connelly 
Political Science 




John Crowther 
History 



Anne Dary 
English 



Brand! Davidson 
English 



Martha Louise Davis 
English/Eiem. Ed. 



Janel DeSmith 
English 



134 SENIORS 




Clinton Dean 
Finance 



Jane Demarest 
Gen. Business 



Jo Demari 
Elem. Education 



Barty Dickinson 
Finance 



Ester Duca 
Management 




Dinli H. Duong 
Pol. Science 



David Erne! 
Bus. Management 



Joel Everett 
Biology 



Cheryl Faircloth 
Marketing 



Lisa Felgate 
Psychology 




Christopher Ferguson 
Psychology 



Christopher Filer 
Finance 



Michael Finley 
French 



Lori Finn 
Elem. Education 



Tara Fitzgerald 
Exer. Science 




James Foley 
Sports Admin. 



Karen Folsom 



Chywana 
Ford Finance 



Adam Forrand 
Marketing 



Laurie Foreman 
English 



CHURCH-FOREMAN 135 




Ann Marie Forkey 
English 



Rene Foster 
Soc. /Business 



Stephanie Francis 
Marketing 



Hampton Friedman 
Pol. Science 



James Taylor Frost 
Art 



lOP HAl 



Deborah has been involved in the 
Club Hispanico, Sigma Delta Pi. and 
Hillel. 

Future plans for Deborah include 
working In the computer science field 
after graduation. 

Dr. Margaret Venzke's class on the 
Modern Middle East has made a 
lasting impression on Deborah 
because of the information on the 
culture and history of Modern Middle 
countries. 

Deborah describes her Stetson expe- 
rience as "challenging" and feels her 
most vivid Stetson experience will be 
graduation. 
Noreen Seacrist 




Tracie Fulkman 
Music Education 



Lily Garcia 
English 



Kathleen Garstka 
Finance 



Jennifer Gewartowski 
English 




Tammy Gillis 
Psychology 



Salvatore J. Gioia Jr. 
Business Admin. 



Jyl Heather Gottlieb 



Heather Grable 
Psychology 




Rebecca Grafer 
English 



Kelly Graham 
Mathematics 



Heather Graig 
English 



Garrett E. Granroth 
Physics 



Linda Grant-Levy 
Marketing 



136 SENIORS 




Renzi Green 
Gen. Education 



Angela Grinstead 
French 



Jennifer Haley 
Pol. Science 



Rob Hammond 
Communications 



Angel Handrich 
Accounting 




Kelly E. Banna 
Elm. Education 



Patrick Harvey 
Psychology 



Tia Hayes 
Psychology 



Deborah Heitman 
Comp. Science 



Kim Helmbold 
Mathematics 




Raymond B. Heskin 
Computer Science 



Gregory Hetherington 
Sociology 



Millard Teal finds himself in an difficult position. 



FORKEY-HETHERINGTON 137 




Jennifer Hiers 
EnglishAVGS 



Kristen Hildreth 
Elem. Education 



Montgomery Hoeft 
Finance 



Elizabeth Hoertz 
Pol. Science 



Lara Holloway 
Psychology 




Tiffini Holtsberg 
Biology 



Jason Hosaflook 
Accounting 



Keri Hunt 
Psychology 



Jennifer Isaly 
Psychology 



Randy Jackson 
Gen. Business 




William Jackson 
Chemistry 



Michael E. Jaffee 
Finance 



William A. Jefferies 
Phil. /Pol. Science 



Julie Beth Jerbi 
Music Education 



Jennifer M. Johnson 
Mathematics 




Kevin Johnson 
English 



Kristi L. Johnson 



Martin Kaestner 
Marketing 



Lucie Karr 
Foreign Language 



Robert Kellogg 
Music Performance 



138 STETSON UNIVERSITY 



i 




Suzanne P. Kerigan 
Marketing 



Kathleen Kilhoffer 
Management 



Liz Kinane 
Psychology 



Jeanine Kiser 

Education 



Kevin Kline 
Finance 




Lara Klund 
Psychology 



Paige Knaebel 
Humanities 



Julie M. Koenig 
English 



Julie Kohler 
English 



Jennifer Kohms 
English 




Richard Kolb 
Finance 



Frank Kortleven 
Gen. Business 



Stijn Kortleven 
Gen. Business 



Melinda Landry 
Elem. Education 



Hilary Latcheran 
English 




Jeff Leach 
Finance 



Lucy Leach 
Elem. Education 



Christian Lerro 
Exer. Science 



Ulli Lindauer 
Marketing 



Tia Mc Kenna LLoyd 
Accounting 



HILDRETH-LLOYD 139 




Elizabeth Long 

Communications 



Nicole Lorences 

Mathematics 



Christina Ludington 



Sandra Maltby 

English 



Melissa Marcello 

Psychology 




William Martling 

Finance 



Kristen Mauceri 
Business Admin. 



Jason Maughan 
Pol. Science 



Heather Mc Aleer 

Communications 



Melissa J. Marshall 
Elem. Education 



Pearl has been active at 
Stetson in ttie Pantiellenic 
Council as vice-president and 
played intramural volleyball. 
She was Honne-coming Queen 
in 1992. 

Pearl's future plans include 
working as an agent for a 
nnodeling agency Arlene 
Wilson Models, in Atlanta. 
Georgia. Pearl hopes to have 
her own agency one day 

Dr Jerri Witek has been an 
inspiration to Pearl since her 
freshman year because of her 
love of teaching, if Pearl were 
to decide to become a 
teacher it would be because 
of this relationship. 

Pearl's words to live by: 
"Success means nothing unless 
you have people to share it 
with. " 

Noreen Seacrist 




Joel McCandless 
Marketing 



Elem. Education 



140 SENIORS 




Todd Merrill 

Gen. Business 



Kevin Miller 

Accounting 



Elizabeth W. Mitchell 

Accounting 



Craig Morhach 

Finance 



Thierry Morion 

English/Frencil 




Brian M. Motycka 

Management 



Kareen Mourra 
Biology 



Guy Mower 
Marketing 



Eric E. Muenks 
Psychology 



Sheri Murphy 

Marlieting 




Melissa Muzzy 
Gen. Business 



Joanna Dawn Newman 

Sports Admin. 



Ngan Ngo 
Marlieting 



Jim Nichols 

Finance 



Marney Nolan 

Accounting 




Ryan O'Connor William Kraig O'Hara Michelle O'Lear 

Poi. Science Finance Econ/Spanisli 



Kerry Oertel 

Elem. Education 



Anita Ogden 



LONG-OGDEN 141 




Angelique Washington and Stephanie 
HolHs talk for a few minutes after the 
Luau. 



Julie Pearson 

Gen. Business 



Jeffrey K. Perkinson 

Marketing 



Suzanne Pignianelli 

Elem. Education 



Randall Pinder 

English 






Mitchell J. Pineault 


Andy Pirtle 


Julie Plocar 


Paul W. Plyler 


Jennifer Pogue 




Business Admin. 


Gen. Business 


Mathematics 


English 


Finance 


142 SENIORS 














Jodi Preti 

Biology 



Alison Propes 
Gen. Business 



Richard W. Raiord 

Marlieting 



Dawn Redmon 

Sports Admin. 



Kosliii O. Reed 
English 




Allison Righter 

Biology 



Racliel Roacli 

Business Finance 



Ryan Rodrick 

Marketing 



Lance Rodriguez 

Business Admin. 



Mayte Rodriguez 
English 




Walter A. Rogero II 
Music Educ. 



Laura Russell 

Finance 



Laurie Rogers 



Marltus Rombacli 

Music 



Tammy Kay Royle 

English 




Kip Rupp 

Finance 



Dave Hererra 
and Carmen 
Hendricks at 
the Hawaiian 
Luau. 



Elizabetli Sadlier 

English 



Sean Sanborn 
Computer Science 




OLIVIERI-SANBORN 143 




John A. Sanchez 
Accounting 



Anthony Sanchez 
Pol. Science 



Jeff Scarbrough 
Acounting 



Nicole Schuike 
Elem. Education 



Philip Schultz 
Finance 




Laura Ann Shealy 
Gen. Business 



Elizabeth Shearman 
Music 



Amy Shields 
Biology 



Michael E. Sigl 
Humanities 



Kimberly Simonds 
Pol. Science 




Denise Singleton 
Corp. Finance 



Russell Slappey 
Accounting 



Jennifer L. Small 
Music Perf. 



144 PEOPLE 




Ray Smith 
Finance 



Amy Snell 
English 



Keri Lynn Snodgrass 
Biology 



Marley Stepp 
Gen. Business 



Missy Stogner 
Marlieting 




Jo Ann Stratakes 
Accounting 



Maite Taboada 
English 



Talamge P. Vick 
English 



Dawn Tartar 
Accounting 



Michelle Taylor 
English 




Thomas Taylor 
Finance 



Millard Teal 
Biology/French 



Owen C. Teng 
Accounting 



Steven T. ThUI 
Finance 



Julie Thomas 
Marketing 




SANCHEZ-THOMAS 145 




Steven Thomas 
Social Sciences 



Wade Thomas 
Marketing 



Jennifer Thompson 
Marketing 



Shelley Thompson 
Social Science 



Nicole Titus 
Psychology 



146 PEOPLE 




Christopher Trinkle 
Marketing 



David Turner 
Sports Admin. 




Geremy Van Arkel 
Finance 



Krissa Vance 
Economics 



Patricia Veltri 
Marketing 



Eric Von Deck 
Philosopliy 



Amy Vose 
Finance 




Ruth Watkins 
Music Educ. 



Mary Watson 
Education 



Jason Wells 
Gen. Business 



Nell Wender 
Exer. Science 



Vickie Marie Whaling 
Elem. EdJMr Art 



147 




Robert Wilkes 
Sports Admin. 



Dapline Williams 
Elem. Education 



David WiUis 
Mathematics 



Jeffrey Wilson 
English 



Jessica Wilton 
Accounting 




Christine Wolf 
Art 



Joy Woodson 



Michael Workman 
Accounting 



Andrew J. Wright 
Finance 



Charles Wright 
Economics 




Karen Wrobel 
English 



148 THOMAS-WHALING 



u 

N 
D 



C 



M 
E 
N 



Nicole Abbruscato 96 

Steve Allender 96 

Carmen Alvarez 94 

David Alvin 94 

Christian Amatea 94 



Todd Ancher 95 

Heather Anderson 96 

RolaArbid 96 

Derek Ashworth 94 

Cari Aspacher 94 



Erin E. Bailey 96 

Sandy Baldwin 96 

Donna Bandich 96 

Kevin Barber 96 

W. Bill Barnes Jr. 94 



Guadalupe Barragan 96 

Lavisca Bartee 95 

Jeffery Bates 96 

Lois Bass 95 

Elizabeth Bassett 95 



lOP HAl 



Michelle is a member of Zeta Tau 
Alpha and was co-chairperson of the 
Crown Classic. She will be in England 
For the '93 fall term. 

Dr. Wayne Baily's Law and Society 
class has made an impression on 
Michelle. She plans to go to law school 
or graduate school. 

How does Michelle view Stetson? As 
a "small community of friends. " 

Noreen Seacrist 




John Carlin 

Beaver 96 

Karen 

Beckett 95 

John Bender 96 

Chad Berardi 96 



Shannon 

Bernhardt 96 

Bonnie 

Bernier 96 

Chrystal 

Berninger 95 

Barbara 

Berry 95 



150 UNDERCLASSMEN 




Leanne Billington 94 
Erica N. Bilsky 95 
Deborah Black 94 
Tanya Lyn Blair 
Jean Blutenthal 96 
Sonia Bonilla 95 




Rebekah 

Boothe 96 
Kesia 

Boother 94 
Michelle 

Bottex 96 
Allison 

Boulware 96 

Jenny Rebecca 

Boyd 95 
Scott Boyer 96 
Rebecca 

Bridges 94 
George 

Broward 96 



Donna Bryan 94 
Dayle Bryant 95 
Linda 
Bubbers 94 
Brad Budd 95 




Ron Pic- 
colo and 
Pearl 
Ashcraft 
were 
crowned 
Home- 
coming 
King and 
Queen. 



Lori Burdick 96 
Jay Burleson 96 
Tammy M. burns 94 
Christine Burton 94 
Rich Buxman 96 
Brian Buzek 94 



Cindy Cable 95 
Shane Cadden 96 
Ron Cantlay 94 
Janet Capak 94 
Holly R. Capell 95 
Tina Marie 
Capestany 95 



Andy Cappar 94 
Ellen Caranasos 95 
Rosemary Carbone 94 
Brad Carlson 95 
Jennifer Carpenter 95 
Michele Carpenter 95 



ABBRUSCATO-CARPENTER 151 



Amy L. Carr 95 

Eric J. Carr 94 

Rhesa Carroll 96 

Anissa T. Carter 96 

Charlene 

Castleman 96 

John Cawrse 95 



Chun Chase 96 

Bryan Cochran 96 

Clayton Collins 95 

Tammy Collins 96 

Anna Compagine 95 

Melanie Cook 96 



Amanda Cooper 94 

Beth Ann Copeland 96 

Penny E. Cople 94 

April Cowan 95 

Thomas F. Coyle 96 

Leigh Crandall 95 



Tesse Crowley 95 

Crista Cuesto 96 

Michele Benson 

Culver 95 

Mercedes Cuprill 96 

Melissa Darios 96 

Julie Davis 94 



Shanpatrick Davis 96 

Barbara De La Fe 95 

Marisol 

De La Sancha 95 

Elizabeth Dean 94 

Richard Dean 95 

Stacia Deedrick 94 



Mariah Dehaven 95 

Joe Denave 96 

Serge Desir 96 

Cynthia Destefano 95 

Kimberly Devore 96 

Jason Di Lorenzo 95 



Dimitri Diatchenko 94 

Dana Dougherty 94 

Jackie Douglass 

Shannon Dowdy 94 

Karen Doyle 95 

Thomas Drybrough 94 



152 UNDERCLASSMEN 





Laura Dunifon 95 
John Durrani 96 
Taisia Ealy 96 
Berdina Ellis 95 
Sam Elsberry 96 
Missy Emrich 94 



Piane Enrique 96 
Roosevelt Escalante 96 
Craig Evans 94 
Dana Faircloth 96 
Paul Falk 96 
Yvett Fallone 95 



Corinna Farmer 94 
Michael E. Fedora 94 
Kristina Figueroa 96 
Emily Fisher 96 
Jane Fleming 95 
Joy Fletcher 96 



Melody K. Float 96 
Robert W. Flowers 94 
Tricia Forrand 95 
Mark Freeman 95 
Tricia Frost 94 
Amy Lee Fry 95 



Dr. Dick- 
son 
helped 
out at the 
orienta- 
tion ses- 
sions 
during 
FOCUS, 
advisor 
tables 
were set 
up for 
students 
to ask 
questions 
about 
class 
sched- 
ules. 



CARR-GAWRON 153 



Angela Gay 96 

Charles Gehrke 96 

Sabiha Ghoghawala 94 

Anastasia Gionis 95 

Allison Glenzer 9S 

Elenita Gomez 94 



Todd Gordon 94 

Glenn Gottfried 94 

Jill Graves 94 

Margit Grieb 94 

Ophelia Grillo 96 

Heidi Grimes 95 



Kimberly 

Gronemeyer 96 

Nelly Guirgis 96 

Karen Hadjez 95 

Heather Hahn 95 

Adrienne Hall 96 

Blayne Hall 96 



Dawn Hall-Bowe 96 

Derek Hamilton 95 

Joy Hammond 96 

Charles Haney 96 

Brandy Hare 94 

Jynnifer Hargrove 96 



Chris Harkins 96 

Nichole Hatcher 95 

Timothy Haugaard 94 

Jacqueline Hawkins 96 

Christine Helm 96 

Carmen Hendricks 95 



Denise Henry 95 

Diane Heritage 95 

Amy Hessler 96 

Paul Heflin 96 

Tara Hier 96 

Catherine Hileman 95 



Rhonda Hill 96 

James Monty Hine 96 

Jason Hiss 95 

Donald Hitchcock 94 

Mary Lynn Hitson 94 

Paige Hobbs 96 



154 UNDERCLASSMEN 





Heather Keegan 9S 
Julie Kellams 96 
Kimberly Keller 96 
Adam Kennedy 94 
Kevin Michael Kerr 

94 
Michael Kirschner 95 



Laura J. Klossner 94 
Katheryn Knutson 96 
Michele Kokkinos 96 
Lori Kolb 96 
Amy L. Koss 95 
Denise Kubik 95 



GAY-HOLBEIN 155 



Jerome Kyles 96 

Jorge Lamarche 96 

Kimberly Lane 

Lanie Lansdell 94 

Mario Lanzisera 96 

Lynn Anne 

Lashbrook 94 



Cynthia Late 94 
Alexander Latour 96 
Christopher 
Lawson 96 
Angel Lentz 
Denise Long 
Diane Long 



Tom Long 96 
Jason Longo 96 
Cindy Lovell 94 
Anne Lowery 94 
Celines Lugo 96 
Rainer Max 
Luttgens 94 



Jennifer Maendel 95 

Lisa Kay Manion 94 

Mary Manly 94 

Christy Marks 95 

Samira Marrero 95 

Susan Marston 96 



David Mason 95 

Ashley Mc Comb 94 

Sheila Mc Donough 96 

Bridgette Mc Elwee 94 

April Mc Glinchy 96 

Heather Mc Grath 96 




A scavenger hunt was 
one of the group activ- 
ities arranged by 
FOCUS. The hunt 
began at the fountain 
and went as far as 
McDonalds. 



156 UNDERCLASSMEN 





Ginger-Anne 

Mc Question 96 
Kathleen 

Mc Quone95 
Kirsten 

Mcllrath 95 
Bryan 

McMinn 96 



Christine 
Meagher 95 

James 
Meagher 94 

Jason Meltzer 95 

Brian 
Meredith 96 



Neja M. 

Merkel 95 
Farris 

Merritt 94 
Jeff Meyer 95 
Melody 

Meyer 95 



lop m 



Don has been active at Stetson as 
vice-president of Amnesty International. 
He organized a kick-off concert for tfie 
1993 Earth Week festivities. He was 
chosen as a Vaughn-Jordan Scholar 
from 1992-1 99 A. On the wild side, he 
has assisted on biological research of 
the Dusky Rattlesnake. 

Future plans include a summer 
internship at the State Botanical Gar- 
dens of Georgia in Athens. GA and Stet- 
son and graduation. 

Don is not partial to anyone profes- 
sor or course but feels that Drs. Nor- 
man. May. and Farrell have all been 
instrumental in providing an excellent 
groundwork for his further study. What 
Stetson means to Don? "An opportunity 
for accomplishment and success. " 
Noreen Seacrist 



Woody Meyer 94 
Laura Meyers 94 
Dana Mier 96 
Edgar Peter Millan 95 
Matthew Miller 96 
Richard Miller 96 



Tami C. Miller 95 
Charmaine Milton 95 
Jennifer 

Mitchell 95 
Ty Monk 95 
Meredith 

Montgomery 96 
Kristen Moody 96 



Disstan Moore 96 
Teresa Morales 95 
Karl Morawski 96 
Kelli Morgan 95 
Michele Morris 95 
Jana Morrison 95 



Kelly Murphy 95 
Joy Murray 94 
Michael S. Murray 96 
Nicole Mytyk 94 
Joyce Nailling 94 
Natasa Nastasic 95 



KYLES-NASTASIC 157 



Rick Nelson 94 

Nancy Newman 95 

Loan Nguyen 96 

John Nicholson 94 

Josh Nye 96 

Christopher 

O'Brien 96 



Megin O'Donnell 95 

Erin O'Neil 96 

Cherie O'Neill 96 

Michael O'Neill 95 

Amanda Oliver 95 

Debi Orchard 96 



Gil Orlando 94 

Jennifer Osborne 94 

Keef Owens 95 

Nora Oxley 95 

Stephanie Painton 96 

Jay Pak 96 



Dexter Palmer 95 

Stacey Papadeas 94 

Kirk Parker 95 

Eva G. Pastora 96 

Aarti Patel 95 

Menal Patel 95 



Vaishali Patel 96 

Rebecca Pawlus 94 

Laura Pelletier 94 

Victor Peronti 95 

Christina Peterson 94 

Lor! Petley 96 



Dan Phelan 95 

Michelle Phillips 94 

Tina Phillips 94 

Tonya Phillips 94 

Robert D. Picard 96 

Debbie Pike 94 



Debra Plains 94 

Stephen Plant 94 

Delphine Pontvieux 96 

Penelope Potts 94 

April Powell 94 

William Premock 96 




J 58 UNDERCLASSMEN 




Ricardo Pruneda 95 
Edmundo Pustizzi 96 
Sandra Radivonyk 94 
Robert Ramella 95 
Joseph Raska 95 
Dawn Rasmussen 95 



Kelli Redd 94 
Eric Remington 94 
Christine Remirez 96 
Sean A. Richter 95 
Claudine Rivera 94 
Yovannie Rodiguez 96 



Tomasita Rodriguez 96 
Katjia Rojas 96 
Michael Rojas 94 
Yanzza Rojas 94 
Richard Romine 96 
John Rosebottom 96 



Melanie Rosen 94 
Bill Rotella 94 
Jennifer Roth 96 
Mitzi Russell 96 
Andrew Rutledge 96 
Deborah M. Ryals 94 




J. T. Ryan 95 
Dominique 
Salamone 94 
Patrick Sans 94 



Veronica 
Santiago 96 

Shea 
Sargeant 94 

Kevin Schuck 96 



Ellen Collier 

Scott 94 

Scott Wesley 94 
Noreen 
Seacrist 94 




Ashley Scutter takes a minute out of her busy schedule to 
write a letter to a friend. 



NELSON-SEACRIST 159 



Cheryl Sevick 95 

Mona Shah 96 

Fielding Shaw 95 

Chad Shoemaker 96 

Mark Sibons 94 

Jennifer Simmons 



Tiffany Smith 96 

Toni Smith 95 

Janet Smout 94 

Bruce Snipes 94 

Ana Maria Soto 96 

Don Spence 94 



Joyce St. Thomas 96 

Lance Starr 95 

Adam Steckley 94 

Matt Stevenson 95 

Lisa Stewart 96 

Peter Stickney 96 



Jacque Stonewater 94 

Ben C. Stoddard 96 

Denise Stuart 96 

Andrea Suplick 95 

Melissa Surface 95 

Steven Survance 95 



Kenny Suzuki 96 

Karen Tame 95 

Stephanie Taplin 94 

Forrest Teipel 96 

May Thomas 95 

Mary Ellen 

Thompson 96 



Stephen Tice 95 

Marlyn Tompkins 96 

Cristina Torres 96 

Peter A. Trakas 95 

Brian Trimyer 96 

Jarmila Trneckova 96 



Necheeka Trott 95 

Kimberly Tuckis 94 

Dawn Turner 96 

Lisa Uchrin 95 

Todd Van Meer 96 

Gwendalyn 

Valencis 94 




160 UNDERCLASSMEN 




Heather Vance 

Hei95 
Susan Varkey 96 
Steven Veite 96 
Tina Villanova 96 
Sheryl 

Villeneuve 96 
Paul Walker 95 



Richard Walsh 94 
Rachel Ward 96 
Janna Warner 95 
Jennifer Warner 95 
Angelique 

Washington 95 
John D. Watts 94 



Brian Weidhardt 
96 

Meredith Weigel 95 
Andrew 

Weitzman 96 
Jason Welch 95 
Shelley Wells 94 
Tricia Wentzel 94 



William 

Westbrook 94 
Wendy Weston 96 
Tonya 

Wisemiller 96 
Bradley Wheeler 94 
Kristyn 

Whetstone 96 
Jarrod White 94 

Michelle White 94 
Carrie Whitley 94 
Jeffrey Wilen 94 
Jason Wilke 96 
Chad Wilkinson 96 
Justin Williams 96 



Sharyl Williams 94 
Eric Walters 96 
Kurt 
Worchester 96 
Michele Wothe 94 
Emily Wright 94 
Dawn Yeargin 95 



Michelle Yerkes 95 
April Young 96 
Katherine Zaner 94 
Calla Zilant 95 
Tricia Zippay 95 



SEVICK-ZIPPAY 161 



STETSON 

LAW 
SCHOOL 



In 1883, Stetson Univrsity was 
established as Florida's first uni- 
versity. Seventeen years later, in 
1900, Stetson University College of 
Law was founded and became 
Florida's first law school. Original- 
ly connected to the main DeLand 
campus, the law school moved to its 
current St. Petersburg location in 
1954. At that time the student body 
consisted of 100 students. Today, 
the law school has a population 
which totals over 650 students. 

Because of its academic excel- 
lence, the College of Law attracts a 
national student body. Approxi- 
mately 160 colleges and 40 states 
are represented by the currently- 
enrolled students. As of May 1993, 
forty-nine members of the student 
body obtained their undergraduate 
degrees from Stetson University. 
Approximately fifty percent of the 
student body is female, fifteen per- 
cent represent minorities and a 
substantial number of students are 
over the age of twenty-five. It is 
this diversity, in combination with 
the superior academic curriculum, 
that gives Stetson students the 
skills necessary to excel in the legal 
profession. 



162 STETSON LAW SCHOOL 





Suzette Alfonso 
Elliot T. Ambrose 
Melissa D. Atkinson 
A. Irving Awerman 
Michael J.P. Baker 



Patrick Barbary 
Stephen A. Barnes 
Anne E. Bast 
Christine A. Basta 
Douglas M. Bates 



David C. Bearden 
Line Marie Benkert 
Luis M. Bessone 
Vickie St. Clair Bills 
Julie D. Bliton 



George J. Bochis 
Janet C. Booth 
James C. Bounds 
William J. Boyce 
Susan M. Burk 



Deborah L. Burnett 
Robert A. Carnegie 
Sandra C. Carroll 
Shari Castagnos 
Mark A. Catchur 



Rafael A. Castro 
Michelle L Cates 
Paul R. Cavonis 
Mike Choi 
Macon Clark 



SENIORS 163 



Michae; C. Clarke 

Elizabeth A. Cleveland 

Ursula J. Haessner Cochran 

Alfred A. Colby 

Candace S. Collins 



William J. Cook 

E. Channing Coolidge 

Ronald I. Croft 

John Cuesta HI 

D. Tobyn De Young 



Steven W. Davis 

Terry Deeb 

Lydia C. Dempsey 

Stephen C. Diaco 

William M. Dickerson 



John W. Dill 

LeAndrea E. Drum 

Jaime B. Eagan 

Christine E. Eakle 

Matthew D. Emerson 



Sepideh Suzette Eskandari 

David J. Evans 

Natalie R. Everett 

Elizabeth J. Fedele 

Ivonne L. Fernandez 



Thomas S. Flanigon 

Paul F. Flounlacker 

Margaret A. Fonvielle 

David Forziano 

Lynn G. Franklin 




164 LAW SCHOOL 




Stephanie J. FrusheU 
Brenda S. Fulmer 
Robin F. Fuson 
Treveno L. Gaylord 
Jennifer L. Gentry 



Joy M. Goff 
Camille M. Gioia 
Elton J. Gissendanner 
Bonnie J. GIvoer 
Barbara C. Goiran 



Michael E. Goodbread 
Clifton H. Gorenflo 
Patrick J. Gorman 
Catherine E. Green 
Andrew C. Greenberg 



Patricia A. Hall 
James P. Harris 
Sandra Harris Daniel 
Ilene M. Harrison 
Matthew E. Haynes 



Kim R. Helper 
Douglas L. Hilkert 
Judith G. Hill 
Deborah F. Hogge 
David A. Holmes 



Christopher M. Holland 
Joseph D. Hunt 
Gary R. Jodat 
Thomas L. Johnson 
Marilyn M. Jones 



SENIORS 165 



Carol Ann Kalish 

Theodore E. Karatinos 

Stephanie S. Kika 

Paul S. Kimsey 

Mary E. King 



William A. Knight 

Brian S. Kramer 

Cindy L. Krantzler 

Debra D. Kroeger 

Patricia F. Kuhlman 



Richard D. Leal 

Stephen R. Leslie 

Christopher A. Liken 

Stuart Lee Lipshultz 

Mai^erite Longoria- 

Robinson 



Paul O. Lopez 
Jefferey A. Luhrsen 

Julie Anne Luten 
Heather MacKenzie 

Jeffrey A. Maine 



Simon J. Marie 

Carlos M. Martinez 

Bridget A. Mast 

Michele A. Matrick 

Angela D. McCravy 



Gerald L. McDonald 

Susan C. Meade 

Nell J. Medlin 

Lisa E. Michael 

Cynthia A. Mikos 




166 LAW SCHOOL 




Doricia R. Miller 
Robert A. Miller 
Gale H. Moore 
Steven W. Moore 
Sheri A. Murphy 



Michael S. Murray 
Victor J. Musleh 
Fred Nelson 
Janis Kocki Nelson 
Beverly J. Ness 



Scott D. Neumann 
James R. Nici 
Barbara A. Nohrr 
Adam Oler 
Laura Anne Olson 



Angela E. Outten 
Anthony J. Parrino 
Jon D. Parrish 
Sandip I. Patel 
Mark E. Pena 



Robin A. Petrey 
Erica L. Peterson 
Liselle M. Petzen 
Marguertie A. Pinholder 
Devanee P. Polo 



Janet S. Porges 
Raymond L. Potts 
Josi L. Poythress 
Jon S. Pridgeon 
Laurie L. Puckett 



SENIORS 167 



Jaime R. Quezon 

Michael J. Rachel 

Nina Maria Radosta 

Tracy A. Raffles 

Patrick L. Real 



Michele L. Robinson 

John J. Rogers 

Margarita M. Ruiz 

Fredericl^ B. Rushing 

Nilo J. Sanchez 



Carolyn H. Sawyer 

Thomas G. Sawyer 

Matthew J. Schirmer 

Matthew D. Schultz 

Harold L. Sebring 



Casey D. Shomo 

Richard W. Sibson 

H. Beth Simpson 

Denise Simpson 

Robert J. Sniffen 



Anwar Odeh Snober 

Ann E. Snow 

Kathleen M. Sovic 

Stephen L. Specyor 

Lisa Jo Spencer 



Kimberly A. Staffa 

Michael J. Stephenson 

Garrett P. Swartwood 

Ben W. Subin 

Roland P. Tan 




168 LAW SCHOOL 




Daniel S. Tantleff 
Sylvia Taylor 
Lisa N. Thompson 
Stavros Tingirides 
Sheila D. Turner 



James G. Vickaryous 
Chovine G. Visintainer 
Chris M. Vorbeck 
Joel R. Weaver 
Kim T. Whaley 



Grant Whitmore 
Barbara Wilhite 
Denise M. Wilson 
Brian Wolf 
Jay Wolfson 



Bradley J. Wood 
Robert D. Wooten 
Sherri Workman 
Tyrone Zdravko 
Jennifer A. Zielske 



Philip J. Zies 



NOT PICTURED: Froska 
A. Alfonso, Mark A. Boyle, 
Mary Beth Crumbley, Earl 
M. Johnson, Dawn Michelle 
Kriston, Peter R. Ray, 
Diane Shea Williams, Debo- 
rah S. Williamson, Walter 
C. Zebrowski. 



SENIORS 169 



Stephen D. Ake 

Andres F. Alos 

Lorelei J. Aiterwein 

Denise L. Andersen 

Amy M. Armstrong 

Kelly A. Ayers 



Stephen E. Bailey 

Cordel J, Batchelor 

Kevin L. Bearley 

Elise A. Behnke 

Lori L. Bennett 

Kara F. Berard 



Steven M. Berkeley 

Hilary G. Berko 

Tammle W. Betzner 

Raymond A. Biggart 

Kendrick J. Blackwell 

Sheila M. Bond 



Poong-Jin Bradley 

Carol M. Brice 

Gentry B. Byrnes 

Jeffrey J. Campbell 

Kimberly A. Cannon 

Robert E. Case 



Kerry-Ann M. Chin 

Christopher L. Clark 

Tosha J. Cohen 

Wayne R. Coment 

Mark A. Connolly 

Adrianna Consuelos 



Sharon F. Cook 

Mark A. Cornelius 

Robin M. L. Cornell 

Jennifer L. Cory 

Scott M. Covell 

Angela J. Cowden 



Michael D. Crotty 

Ramona R. Curry 

Sarah H. Dennis 

Bruce H. Denson 

Michael T. Dolce 

Michael J. Donohue 




170 

LAW SCHOOL 




Edith J. Elmore 
Eric J. Enrique 
Ernesto Escobar 
John O'SuUivan Floyd 
Scott D. Foeller 
Ted P. Fritz 



Carrie L. Galbraith 
Julie A. Garbutt 
Jason W. Gelinas 
Joseph R. Giaramita 
Guy H. Gilbert 
W. Glenn Gilpin 



Tammy N. Giroux 
Laura Lee Glass 
Daniel M. Goldberg 
Jessee E. Graham 
M. Megan Graham 
William L Gulliford 



Kelly B. Harkness 
Linda S. Harman 
Sonya Harrall 
M. Deanna Harris 
Shanell M. Hatton 
Terry L. Hodgdon 



James W. Holliday 
Elaine Howard 
Peggy R. Hoyt 
Deborah Hunter-Conley 
Dyana L. laquinto 
Caryle A. Johnson 



Scott A. Johnson 
Anne C. Jones 
Bettty E. Jones 
Tae T. Kelley 
Lee Ann M. Kinzer 
Jeanette C. Knowles 



Judith R. Koch 
Greta K. Kolcon 
Claudia Langenstroer 
R. Lane Lastinger 
Joseph M. Lee 
Lawrence Y. Leonard 



SECOND YEAR STUDENTS 171 



Meredith E. Level 

Robert P. Lilavois 

Cynthia A. Lindbloom 

William J. Lobb 

Randall J. Love 

Carlos M. Machado 



Shayama Maharaj 

Scott A. Markowitz 

Daniel A. Martinez 

Richard S. Maelli 

Loma W. Masse 

John G. Maynard 



Lynn M. McHale 

Joseph C. Meux 

Kenneth A. Minio 

Shirin Mohammadbhoy 

Jennifer M. Monrose 

Elizabeth D. Montalbano 



Maurice A. Mooney 

Kevin J. Morris 

Sallie Y. Norris 

Carl J. Ohall 

Raequel L. Olcese 

William H. Olney 



David M. Orta 

Rebecca L. Palmer 

Richard S. Panttaja 

Stephanie Parillo 

Angelo M. Patacca 

David A. Paul 



Meiisa L. Penney 

Luis A. Perez 

Jeffrey T. Picker 

Claudius H. Pritchard 

K. Prudhomme de 

Lodder 

Jordan E. Prusan 



Russell L. Querry 

Melissa K. Racki 

Cary F. Rada 

Karuna P. Rao 

Joseph S. Reed 

John R. Reid 




172 LAW SCHOOL 




jregorj A. Richard 
.aurie E. Riczko 
' "^ll>;n Ridenour 
L, Ritenour 

IV as 
- Rodriguez 



Michael J. Rogers 
Joseph M, Rooth 
Mary Anne Rutherford 
Robert D. Sale 
Steven Jan Satori 
John C Sawrer 



Bram L. Scharf 
Vincent E. Schindeler 
Julie C. Scott 
Portia B. Scott 
Mary Secord 
Andrew A. Seenath 



Katherine L. Sellers 
Mary A. Sharp 
Robert J. Shuttera 
Jeffrey A. Smith 
Dana M. Solin 
Nicki Spirtos 



Tracey L. Starrett 
Karlene S. Stevens 
Lauri Faber Stitzer 
Doreen A. Stone 
Arnelle M. I. Strand 
Thomas R. Stutler 



Lee F. Taylor 
Robert D. Tetreault 
Andrea L. Teves 
Stephen K. Tilbrook 
Stacey L. Turmel 
Bonnie A. Twardosky 



Jenny Griffith Valdes 
Matthew D. Valdes 
Johanne Valois 
Sara J. Van Lier 
Tara L. Vance 
Brandon S. Vesely 



SECOND YEAR STUDENTS 173 



Sarah E. Warren 

Philip S. Wartenberg 

Rachel A. Wells 

Susan Whitaker 

A. Vicki Wiggins 

Shelley C. Wiggins 



John Wilkerson 

Louise D. Wilkinson 

Karen A. Williams 

Vinita J. Witanachchi 

James D. Wood 

Maria F. Wood 



Kelly S. Worcester 

Gale L. Young 

Carol L. Zimmerly 




Jackie L. Fulford, Royce C. Haddad, Carl H. Heidenreich, Karl R. Koch, Bernard A. Lebedeker, Kristine Susan Marquez, Archibald Alexandei 
Rhodes, Tony E. Rollman, Andrew G. Rosenberg, Kristine A. Smiley, Rhonda E. Stringer. 



174 LAW SCHOOL 




B. B. Abbott 
Andrew L. Adler 
Deedra M. Allen 
Thomas E. Allison 
Christian B. Anouge 



Cynthia Bralunan 
Howard R. Behar 
Lesley V. Benjamin 
Amy Lewis Bergen 
Clare Booth Blancke 
Brian David Bolton 



Philip J. Bonamo 
Guy D. Bradstock 
Steven G. Brangaccio 
Sheryl G. Brinkley 
Nathaniel Brown 
Hunter Jackson 
Brownlee 



Dawn M. Buff 
Michael A. Bullen 
Patrick K. Burke 
Douglas R. Burkett 
Charles M. Burnes 
Kristen M. Buzzanca 



James M. Byrne 
Sammy M. Cacciatore 
Mark E. Calvin 
Bryant R. Camareno 
John R. Cappa 
J. Joseph Carey 



Robin Loel Clark 
Lee A. Cohen 
Kevin E. Coleman 
Brian J. Connelly 
Mary B. Corn 
Stephen F. Coxhead 



George D. Cranton 
Robert J. Crohan 
Robert L. Crown 
Christopher J. Dale 
Alexandra M. De Maio 
Ginger A. DeGroff 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 175 



Mark C. De Sisto 

Joseph F. Diaco 

Robert G. Dittmer 

Karen M. Doering 

Jennfier L. Dolce 

Daniel G. Drake 



Sheryl A. Edwards 

Joseph P. Egger 

Scott F. Eldridge 

Jill N. Emery 

Maria Esposito 

Michelle A. Estlund 



James R. Evans 

Amy Jean Fanzlaw 

Kelly Marie Feeley 

Kathryn R. Fenderson 

Kathleen Ford 

Ian D. Forsythe 



Helen Fouse 

Kimberly L. Franklin 

Rebeca A. Freund 

Nilda P. Galang 

Brett A. Geer 

Kenneth P. Gerber 



Adrienne E. Giordano 

Whitney C. Glaser 

Kenn Gluckman 

Silvia Maria Gonzalez 

John R. Gordon 

Renee H. Gordon 



Heather L. Gray 

Dana Grutchfield 

Michael P. Hamaway 

Mark S. Hamilton 

Rhonda Michelle Hand 

Thomas S. Harmon 



Joseph B. Heimovics 

Mark S. Helm 

Gerald L. Hemness 

Jill R. Henniger 

Clarke G. Hobby 

James A. Hoener 




176 LAW SCHOOL 




Douglas M. Holcomb 
G. R. Hollstrom- 
Hammili 

Charles S. Hondros 
Todd A. Hoover 
Toni Ann Home 
Karen Anne Hummer 



Joan M. Jackson 
Marc D. Johnson 
William C. Jones 
Brad E. Kelsky 
Joanne Kenna 
Michael T. Keough 



Michelle G. Khaw 
John Gray Killinger 
Eric D. Kinsolving 
Glenn F. Kiplinger 
W. Brook Lafferty 
Barbara Ann Lewis 



Kelly C. Liddell 
Lucille Liem 
Sarah A. Long 
Carlos A. Lozano 
Jeanette C. Lucadano 
Lynn A. Ludwig 



Richard E. Macdonald 
Michaela E. Mahoney 
John L Malone 
James D. Marshall 
John P. Martin 
Tracy L. Martinell 



David J. Masterson 
E. Lynn Maxcy 
Blane G. McCarthy 
Susan J. McCarthy 
Patrick J. McCullah 
Mary A. McGillicuddy 



Richard J. McKyton 
James Hoyt McNeil 
Sheri D. McWhorter 
Linda M. Michaels 
Amie D. Miller 
Colin Curtis Mock 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 177 



Peter J. Molinell 

Joan Montagno 

Charles E. Monty 

Susan M. Moore 

Marni M. Morgan 

Matthew M. Morrow 



Sharon L. Neil 

Jonathan S. Newman 

Christina Noel Nieto 

Christine Paticia Nixon 

James L. O'Leary 

Ada P. Oli 



Belisa M. Oliveira 

Terri E. Oster 

Tanya I. Partee 

Jerald S. Paul 

Douglas A. Peebles 
David A. Peek 



Douglas J. Petro 
Holly B. Phillips 
Jon Paul Picotte 
Timothy W. Pleasant 
Sharon L. Preston 
Angela R. Pulido 



Karen Richardson 

Peter A. Rivellini 

Carol M. Rooney 

Stanley F. Rosenberg 

Scott J. Rosenwasser 

Christopher J. Ross 



Thomas R. Roth 

Mark H. Ruff 

Deborah L. Russell 

Phillip B. Russell 

Adrian Rust 

Richard Lee Ruth 



David Sampedro 

Lisa Marie Sampson 

Teresa Anne Sasso 

Monika L. Schilcher 

Vivian Ester Schneider 

Stacey M. Schroeder 




178 LAW SCHOOL 




John F. Schultz 
Holly E. Scott 
Yolanda Y. Scott 
Les E. Segal 
Edward P. Shannon 
Paul A. Shapiro 



Wendi L. Sharrit 
Juanita S. Shephard 
Elaine C. Sherwin 
Kasey Shimberg 
Gerald D. Siebens 
Holly N. Simcox 



Hallema F. Simmons 
Emmie R. Sleeth 
Kathleen L. Smiley 
Laura A. Smith 
Jamie S. Snyder 
Shannon d'Layne Stancil 



Rebecca H. Steele 
Susan Stewart 
Earlynn M. Stillwell 
Andy E. Stinnette 
Kristen J. Stogniew 
Gregory Warren Stoner 



Elizabeth L. Strawn 
Stacy D. Strolla 
Theresa Suarez 
Cynthia A. Sullivan 
Lesley A. Swope 
Brian Lee Tannebaum 



John E. Thomas 
Adrienne E. Trent 
C. Jivan Turna 
S. Cash Ulmer 
Margaret M. Underbill 
Rajeev K. Varma 



Keith Harris 
Wadsworth 
Dane K. Waechter 
Julie E. Walbroel 
Elizabeth A. Walch 
Michael R. Wallace 
Katherine J. Ward 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS 179 



Maida H. Wassermann 

Kevin T. Wells 

Lauralee G. Westine 

Sharon A. Wey 

Frank C. Wheeler 

Maureen J. Whelan 



John E. Wichman 
Michael J. Wiener 
Terry Wigginton 
Patrice M. Williams 
Sarah E. Williams 
Thomas W. Willis 



Laurie B. Woodham 
Pamela Wooley 
Phil S. Yurecka 
Jeffrey J. Zwirn 




Beth Anne French, Christopher T. Fulmer, Helia M. Garrido, Gregory Paul Hengber, Monica Michelle, Leach, David Francesco Mancini 
Stephen Bradley McQuillen, Gregory W. Meier, Mary Radice, Deborah H. Ralton, Rick W. Sadorf, Jason S. Stallings, John N. Upchurch, Pau 
Marshall Weekley, Robert Angus Williams. 



139 LAW SCHOOL 




/\aAjma„ JiMlO 
Abb6(t, £■/& 20 
Abbmedtiy, NuJr 8, 150 
Adm, Cli£l6, 17, 38 
Adikk, Juk 15 
Aeicldmm, Rutk M. 15, 132 
Aicud, ^maml5, 132 
Alba., Eke^M, 36 
AlMak, KiMbe^lO 
Almy, Amml32 

\o', £(iz&te,163 

\m, ^oSfa 16, 17 

138 
■„ Qtktl50 
AUdh, Mm, 132 

Ali/ouuuh, li/eB&16 

Ah/mz, CcmmlO, 90, 150 

Ah/amz, Jam 21, 36, 132 

Aim, Omrd 62, 150 

Aiifim, Totm 132 
Aindlm, CkvuSlm, 150 

Ai^mn. EM T. 163 

Awrtiixr, CkuJ^lM 132 

A^hv, Todd 68, 150 

Andrnw, Hedtti0il5O 
Andmm, Mddkui 14 
Awlmm, TeM, 6, 58, 65, 132 
Anhid, RoL150 
Atuwdsr, DoLm J. 132 
AmU, Plujik 130 
Ailumft, PmilO, 76, 140 
Akkuio>dk, Dmkl50 
Aipaclm, Cww 6, 150 
AOkum, Ezna 13 

AUoMM, Mdm 0. 163 
AthbeB, M. 17 

Athn,, J mil 
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Awenmut,, A. fwinq 163 



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Baikj, 0%. l/\/cuf>ie 88, 130 

BcJexj, Evui £ 150 

BaVtd, Kanm D. 11, 132 
Bavd, Leiietj 63 
Balm, Pern 6, 16 
Bahw, Jmuj 20 
Bakm, MickdJ.P. 163 
BaiduiM, £andy 150 
Baiktmoi, OaMA.132 
BoMtkck, Ooma 150 
BamWi, AiSomj 14 
Bwdjonjj, PdJlhidcl63 
Banhw, flecdkn, 20 
Banhm, KeiAM,150 
BaAkm, BeUtf 20 
Bamao; Lama 132 
BamiA, W. Bill 150 
Bamei, ^ttplimA. 163 
BoamM, £amkAIJU132 
Ba/iMttl, RoMma 132 
BamuieM, WiMum 14 
BamaqoK,, Guadalupe, 150 
Bawy, GiMa 11, 128 
Bwdet, Lamcal50 

BajiOwLm, M7, 44, 45 
Baik, Lou 51, 150 

BaueW, ElLzaheOv 15, 150 
Bait, Ame, E. 163 
Bailh, Clm^lm A. 163 
Baidn, Wml^ 6 
Bcdh, Dougk M. 163 

Bah, jJeny 132, 150 
',, KiM O, u8 



BaOkgtui, Pad 7 9 



BoMH, Robin 150 
Basulc, Rackill 
Bmck, Tim L 150 

BeA, CUc 47, 48 
Bmd, Pluih 73, 150 

Beantim, OajfU C. 163 
Bem/m, CImi 7 

Beavm, Jmmhil5, 74, 150 
\, Jolm,13. 150 
m, J ah 63 
Beckett, Kami 150 
,, QeM21, 63 
I&, Bmm, 21 

r, JeimJ&v 6, 132 
Bewkw, Jolm 150 
Beudvo, Cteve, 12 
BemlLct, DmAd 44, 45 
Beihnt, Lim Moaja 163 
Bemett, Todd 21 
Bemon, Pdkccia 130 

Bemd, CU 47, 150 

BeMoi, Lama L. 132 
Berumd, Kcdhj 36, 37 
Be>udujuidt, \l<atwm, 150 
Be/tmeM,, Bomie 150 
BeMM^w, Ctfjitd 150 
Bemf, Banham 150 
Beuom, LuU M. 163 
BetU, Aiuhal5 
B&ruylm, Pad 16 
BiaM, AiMm 6 
Biaucand, Ken 16 
Bilknqtm, LmM,15, 151 
BiM, l/idie^t Claw 163 
Bdiloj, Emm N. 151 
Bulwp, Lame, 9 
Blz&i, Myim 130 
Black, Oebo>wkl51 
BbuiklmK, Kemjl7, 28, 29 

Tuya 97, 132, 151 

\ Andnea 133 

'„ JuL 0. 163 



182 



i, JeamA 37, 151 
Bodui, Geonge, J. 163 

Boitm, Douq 46, 47, 49 

BomzeJc, JeMiuJm, 10 
Botym, Roy 7, 133 
BotiiMa, Qcma, 15, 151 
BodOt, Janet C. 163 

BoS,, Mam 17 

Boctk, Rehekak 9, 10, 151 
Booth/i, KeiUi 151 
BonJa, Akedlyl33 
Boiek, KoMfda 15, 68 

ikl6,151 

nam, nikiM 6, 151 

\, JoMCi C. 163 

BoutuJeM, OouqU W. 133 

BowMk Mih 7, 68. 97 

Boujhum, HeaOm 10 

Boijce, WiIhmJ.163 

Boyd, Jemj 6, 151 

Boym, £coltl51 

Bnahm, Debbie, 11 

Bnadky, Clmje,130 

Blah, Kami 11 

BnoMck, Ram P. 133 

Btaiwle«hmg, Tneuy 32, 35, 51, 

133 

Bntrnz, MdW47 

Bieuan, ^leplmielO, 38, 39 

Bnldchj, Ghm 47 

Bnidqei, Rehemil51 

Bliggi, FawiU 36 

Biim, MoJUf FaitU 133 

BiJultm, \em, 38 

Btockway, OaM 36 

Btoebiidc, Ryau,14 

Bnwiand, Gwye, 151 

Btotun, Augie 20 

Bkouih, Cowftiuey 133 

BiouJn, Poiwy 3o 

Bnouin,, Jemu(ml5 

BiMun, RoHiMi 7 



BtxM/ui/b, Wendy 15 

Bw^, Willml 47, 49 

Biyaifj, Ooma 6, 9, 151 
Bnyatit, Oayk 151 

I, LiMuh 151 

z, FijmIO 
BuM, BnadWl 
BuILd, FnedM 

BiMon, Roii 14, 133 
Bwulidc, LonilO, 17, 18, 42, 43, 
151 

Bunk, Rkmla 11 

Bwtk, UoM, M. 163 

Bwih, Tom 130 
Bwdeion, Jay 151 
Bwthy, KaOuj 130 
<f, Qtb/eif, 130 
I F'tmk 29 
Burnett, Dehonak L. 163 
BumM, TiMoOy 36 

Bum, LawiiA 133 

Bunti)-, Clmtm 151 
ButtmmM, £an(jha 133 
Bumam,, Rick 16, 151 




Cahk Cudyll,151 
Cadden, ^ttam 151 
Cadet, Fummml 133 

'uU 20, 63, 133 
Lcwjmm A. 14, 63, 133 

CoJUalum, Dehomli,133 
Cam, Benhhy M. 133 
Cadlay, Ron 151 
Capak, JaMetl51 
CapeM, Ho% R. 151 
CapeLtatuj, Tim, ManU, 151 
CapfiaJi, At/dy 151 



I, Many 6, 16 
Camtma, Film, 151 
Canhom, Anditea 10, 151 

Ion, Btadl3, 151 

ion, Doma 133 
F'mlOl 
Cameqie,, RobvitA. 163 
Canpeidm, Jemihi 151 
Cwtpetdm, Mi£kiel51 
Cwipedvi, £lidiy 11 
Cam, Awy L. 6, 152 
Cam, Fm J. 152 

I Rlmal6,17152 

t, £aitdm C. 163 
CoAiotL, Clmten, 133 
Canter, KdtUlm,15, 134 

Cojitm,, AifimU, 152 

Ca/itvi, Jumty 86 
CaffaqiuA, Qluvd 163 
Caideimn, CluvdemU, 152 
CaitJu^, Rafod A. 163 
CtMm, Mank A. 163 

Cdh, Muhik 1. 163 

Coi/OMi, PojulR. 163 
CauiW, JoIm 7, 152 
Ceky, ^cdttl34 
Claigium,, Jemim, 70 
Clime, Cluml52 
CkAoii, Many 42 
CU, Mike, 163 
Clmnok, Gi£q 134 
Ckvwk, Lee, 87 
CluMek, CoMud 134 
CumoMmd, Flic 21 

17,18 

'c, Jaion 44, 45 
Clank, JoUl6,17 
Clank, Maeml63 
Ciemedb, Robent7 
CioulM, Dehonak 134 
Cocknan,, Biyatt, 16, 152 
CoddiMydn,, Jim, 134 



183 



Coh, Jbmm, 6 
Coieumi, Qtb/e, 130 

q, Clm 36, 37 

M130 
i, Clm 63 
U, Omj 71, 157 
'i, CifidJua 17, 32 

Tmmj 9, 11, 157 

CoMwiky, Clm 6, 9, 134 

CoMpagiM, Ama 9, 10, lb J 
ComM, Biim 58, 67 
Comelly, Muhd 134 
Comjw, B'tyaMt79 

CoiOi, Clm 38, 41, 134 

Cook, MeiaMj£,16, 157 
Cook, £ltmm«y 15 
Coob&i, Aumida 152 
Coob&i, Joujtm 15, 134 
Coop&i, RobiM, 17, 18 

CopeLd, B&kAml6, 157 

Copk Pemf E. 157 
ConheW, Cnaig 46, 47, 134 
ConjMm,, D%. Cwwll30 
ConmiM, DmrU Lioiid 134 
CoiMuA, PiuulM 29 




Codm, LmlOl 


Couim, Apidl57 


Coiik Tlwmi F. 13, 157 


CiomJoM, Uiqkl57 


Cnauif&ul, Monk 7 


Cmui, Becid 11 


Cmui, Ewdf 15 


Cioce, Pi,. RudJemne 130 


CiottM, Bilan D. 134 


Cioviioj, Tme>157 


CnouXlm, JoUl4, 134 


Cmz, Emli 74 


CmHf, Cm1al57 


CuMm, Mih 7 


Cul/eji, MiM.Bmoi^l57 


CupiiM, Mmak 157 


Cyi, Bnewla 6 



Doha, ^oif 51 
Damh, Rob&itl4 

Danek, Cluitm 14 
Dane,, Atubwui 130 
Dam, Meiiua 17, 157 
Pa^, Ame 9, 11, 134 
Dm/i(ho(i, BimlJi 134 
Dam, Coma 74 

Dam, Q'imt71, 63 
Dam, Hottj 50, 51 
Dam, Juhl57 

Dam, ManOta LouUe, 134 

Dam, ^ItOMpatkidc 157 

Dam, ^tmf 15 

<k la Pe., BaAham 6, 157, 196 

Deem, Ciuttim, 135 

Dem, ElLzab&kl57 

Dem, Rtckmd 157 

DeAiml, Paige, 10 

DehaAm, Dameik 17, 18 

Dedoi, Bdm/uk 47 

Deedkck, £lMa 157 

DeHm/eif,, MaMnk 14, 157 

Deiap, Di. Jam 130 

Decoder, 0zzi&47 

DeJlmck, Joyce, 130 

De,Lo(eujZo, Jaion, 14 

DeMone^, Jam 135 

DemiAl, J 0-135 

DeMpiey, MoAy 10 

Deim/e, Joe 157 

De,Roia, DamiA,17, 79 

DeAilmm, D%. BilzahetU 130 

Deiui, £enqe,157 

De£mtk, J and 134 

DeiUm, CySia 16, 67, 157 

DejiAm, Damj 70 

Devo^, Kmben&f 10, 74, 75, 157 



DiMlMkjy, DimUilH, 157 
Diaz, Raymmd 70 
DickMoti, BoAtfj 135 
DlekiMoH,, Wetidfj 6 

Dickon,, Di. 67 

DiMm, Elm 10, 47, 43 

DwA, Tkatik 10 
Dohioti,, Maggie 45 
Dommca, Rob 71, o8 
DougMxj, Dam 157 
Douglai, Jaelde, 6, 157 
Dovidy, -CliaiuiM, 6, 51, 152 
Dogk Jdui, 17 38 
Doijk, Kanm 157 
Dnybiougk, Tkowal 152 
Diymotui, KfuakiA 25 
Duca, Eitm 6, 135 

Duff, Pdt38 

Duggan,, Kdthim, 10 

Dtuu/oti, Lama, 11, 16, 17, 153 

Dam, Da^iilO, 47, 43 

Dum, Pen 47 

Dum,, Rlwtula 9, 11 

Duong, Dmk fl. 135 

Dumeg, Biim, 14, 68 

Dunnoiit, JoIm 153 

Duiid, Matt 71 

Dye/i, ViJigum 101 




Ea&f, TaUia 153 
Eduiamk, BeM,14 
E(hwuk, Me, 101 
EU, £alk 16 
Elk, Be>uliml53 
Ehbemy, £aM 7, 153 
Eiwee, BiiJgeir Mc 156 
Buatu 71 



184 



B^, DaMl35 

Bmick, M(My 6, 153 
EmjUjus,, Piam 153 
twiicju&z, DioM 45 
Eicaiadb, R(mimiljl53 
EiUi/ei, Fumm 20 
Bitkada, Jeuica 90 
El/am, Ciaiq 7, 38, 153 
Bmuii, NuuJle, 6 
BmM, Oi. Dime, 130 
Ei/meW, J oil 135 
Bifiz, MegmlO, 73 




FcumIS,, Clwyil35 
FaUiddtk, Dam 153 
Failc, Pad 153 
fJJU, Y^ettl53 
FwiMWi, CoVumi 153 
Fmj, Di. Jadcl30 
Fdm,, MtcJml F. 153 
FelgaHs,, Lua 135 
Fvyuim, Clvtu1hpl(e/i 135 
FmeiJia, DaM 47 
FMl, Rm7 
Fmta, J. 17 

Fi^imoa, KliiUm 153 
Film, Ckutopht 135 
FJefj, Muhdl35 

Fim,, Lm 11, 135 

Fiikn,, Fuuitj 153 

FitzgmU, Tana 20. 135 
Fiamg, Jam 6, 58, 60, 97, 

153 
FMcIm, Joy 153 
FU, MeUi K- ^53 
FLim, Pobb 63, 153 
Foki, Ji^ 38, 135 



i, Kmtm 32, 33, 34, 45 
FAoM, fCmic 20, 135 

Fotd, Clujuiaua 135 
Fo>id, L-OMiua, 32 
Fonemuf,, Launi& 101, 135 
FonemM, LamiA 101, 135 
Fonkoj, Am, ManiA 136 
Foitm,, Rem 136 
FnoKCii, ^teplmuA 136 
Fnazm,, Cuwly 20 
Ftmmn, Clvuilij 10 
Ftmrnn, Manic 153 
FiisdMcm, HaMpton 13 u 
Fiimfefv, Biian 25 
Fwit, Jamei Taylon, 136 

Fnoit, Tma 45, 153 

Fitf, Any Lee, 153 
Fuck, Tahitka,10 
Fulkmui, Tweue, 136 

I, Kmm, W. 36, 153 

I, levy 36 
Fu&M, Deden, 47 
FtmqlMcr, Banhana 11 
Funey, Liz 153 
Funmudck, Fnin, 11 




Gaqeu,, J ami 14 
Gauhf, Monk 153 
Galuile,, Qeonqi, 21 
Gakhj, Manic 16 

Leame,153 
Aanm 27, 47 
GaMiejM, CmoiiM 20 
GoMpe/ur, Camiie, 15 

Ganrn,, Ldij 1365 

Gancia, Twy 12 



Ganeau,, CanniA 15 

Camtt, Tm/u 29 

Gannju^m, MuJml 44 

Gan/atmi, Gim, 10 

GaniKka, KaOdeeif, 136 

Gam/iM,, EiM 153 

GatiJiotc, CkiiJ^dm 11, 153 

Gay, A^da, 24, 154 

Gekh, CimJk 154 

Geuiantbwild, Jemihi 6, 60, 68, 

136 

GkoqlmuiaSjo,, ^ah'dia 9 , 11, 154 
GluMem, Ted 16 
Gibioti, Clva^JoM, 14, 63 

^Mil6,17 

)(£,, Oi. Bnyan 130 
"u, Tatmuj 136 
Gtoia Jl. , €aii/dtim J. 136 
Gmii, AKoitaiia 154 
Gimli, €tacl 15, 17 
GvdiMqlmiie, MixhkU 
Glm^en,, Alkoiil54 
GLdy, Af>'uiMel56 
Goben,, MdOkui 38, 39 
GoMmd, Jeff 21 
Goiditho^, KtM 20 
Gowe,z, Fieiuta 154 
Gotmz, GtBg 12 
Gowe,z, JaiAm 47 
Gondon, Todd 154 
GoOhed, Gieml54 
GcMeh, Jyll5, 136 
Gnable,, Hea0m,136 
Gwhk, JeimFen 8 
Giafen, Rebecca 10, 73, 136 
Gmlum, Keily 136 
Gnaiq, fleMm 42, 43, 136 
Gmmtk, GannetH 62, 136 
GnoMC-Lej/y, Linda 136 
Gnai/aMjo', AIom, 7 
Gm/ei, JM154 
Gieen, RenzL 137 



185 



GmM, JiM 25 



M21 68 
Gmh, Majiqirl54 
Gtm, Domli29, 30 
GmSLy, 0f>kL154 
Gnum, ^ajL 20, 63, 68, 154 

Gtitm, hleidil5, 137 
GtlMitiad, Angela 15, 137 
Giomneif&i, Ktinhmly 8, 154 
Gnusickouj, ^uim 6 

GiMqii, Ndly 6, 8, 154 
GuSmiM, Fiofa 11 



-//- 



Ha^ez, KaAml54 

HaggoAd, TiM 79 

HoJm, HedOm 15, 154 

Haioj, JemiJfm 137 

Admsme, 16, 154 
Bimj^l54 
JaekiA 6, 8 

RLck47 

l-Bouie^, Daw K, 154 
flambm, Dmek 154 
HamMm, Monk 21 
Hamnowd, Jo<j 154 
Haumoifd, Rob 137 
HomMcIi, Angdl37 
^oMSfj, CimJk 154 
Hami, KSi E. 137 
floMmfo^, BiM21 
HaMMnlond, Qfhwj 20 
Hamum, ClviU 47 
HoMiM, £lh/e, 44, 45 
hiam, BiatuJjj 154 
Hamtiood, F. 17 
Hangnoi/e, JemiJ&il54 
floAldM, Clm 154 



Ha/iMM, CoKtly 11 
l-lamu, Lua 11, 50, 51 
Hcmu, Lua 68 
Ha/it, JomUx, 68 
Ha£, Meha8 
Hawuj, Rithidcl37 
Haieakeng, Buice, 21 
Hdttim, Nijdwkl54 
l-lcHMd, Ual5 
Haugaml, TiMotiuj 154 
HaujIdM, Jaccjuelim 17, 154 
f/mfei, EmlflO, 73 
f/agu, Tia 10, 137 

flMM,, Bml30 

HeitMm, Gtndl36 
HeitmM, Deho>mkl37 
HeicouJikl, Jcl2 

fleL, Clm1iMl6, 154 
HeUM, Km 137 
hevmufq, Gl£q 7 

Hmkuk, Cwum, 20, 91 154 

hlemeuij, KMj 137 

Hmuj, DeMiel54 

Hmd, Jmuj 21 

fleMitage,, Dwml6, 154 

Hwma, Dai/U 137 

He^cM, ReujMmd B. 137 

Umlm, AiMJi 11, 154 

HeOmiMglm, Giegoy 137 

HoL, Pad 154 

HettJim, KiM 6 

Um, Tarn 154 

Him, JmuJen, 62, 138 

HiUtetU, Kmlm 20, 138 

f^iLm,, CdtkniM 42, 43, 154 

M, RimJa 9, 15, 154 

nimqaih, ■Ciamott 10 

fluie. Jam MoiHij 16, 154 

nim, ^kuun 21 

Mw, JoLM 7, 154 

f^ilikx>cJc, Pomle 68, 98, 154 

fltUoa, Manfi Ljm 154 



Hobk, Paige 17, 154 

l-lobk, ^eoM, 7, 155 
HoeA, Mcmtij 68, 138 
flo&itz, Ekzahetkl38 
HoffwoM,, Heidi 15 
HogeM., Ekzahetk 22, 155 
HJhem, MuJmd 7, 16, 155 
l4oU0v, Aikml55 
Holki, JoMieee, 42, 43 

l^cMxj, MoaJc 7, 97 
HM, QUpkoMizU, 18 

HoiLvioij, Lam 6, 138 
HoUoviOfj, Tarn, 155 
HofMii, JeMihil55 
Hoiibeng, TMml138 

HoizapM, KSill,1718 
Hookm, Dmrd44, 45 

How/vi, 2. 17 

l-lopldM, Clm 79 

Hofitm, Tom 21 
noiaflook, Jaion 138 
Houck, AiffUal55 
Howm, Cki^lO 
Home, CaOy 11 

HouieM, M 38 
Hoij, Clm 97, 155 

HuhboAd, Reid 7 
Huhm, KmHeW 
Huife, Clm 7 
^ufyeShi, Jaim 47 
Huglm, Clmlei 14 
HuLziMqa, Clvui 14, 63 
HiMhentlon, Kdtk/um-Joij 155 
Hiwplmj, Ttacetj 8, 20 

Hu^, Kmll, 63,138 

l-ludvi, CaAdl55 
Hudvi, Jui(k,155 

H(Mih, Mih 8 
Hudvv, Muffy 9 
Hijlwd, KeJJtkM 

HyzuJa, Bneam 155 



186 



Aanm 47 

Hoik 5, 15, 68 

lonL, Bechj 6, 9 
Ima, Cdltimim 130 
liaAj, JemiJ&il38 
km, Vahu&lSO 




JackiM, Clmniue 155 
Jouh^M, Raujij 138 

Jadam, WiM38, 41,138 

Jafk, MLcImlB.138 
Jaggm, Lm 20 

JSm, WiMum A. 17, 138 

JetJdM, Clofj 17, 18 

JsMkm, Mam, 194 

Jenhl, Julie 68, 138 
JiMimz, Augie 60, 78, 155 

J ok, MikM155 

Joiufi, AlMj 11, 155 

JoUm, Am} 17, 18, 20, 155 
Joimiotu, Pieya 8, 11, 155 
Joiufioii, Jean ReMe& 155 
Jolmim, Jeml/m M. 138 
Jolmm, Juh,15, 37, 155 

JoUm, Kern 38, 40, 41, 138 

Jokiofi, Launm-NUiois^ 155 

JoUtm, Kmt 20, 138 
Jom, Kewti 9, 15 

Jam, Namj 130 
Joiepk, Joy 11, 16, 51 
Joij, £uian, 45 




Kmtim; MaMti 138 

Kam, LujuiA 138 

Kwikuenj, CoDiJim 6 

KeadMg, CoAjyu, 20 

Kedtm, Petftm 29 

Keegm, HedlhA,17, 20, 37, 155 

Keetm, Loni 20 

Km, Amij 15 
KMmi, Juhl55 

Kelkv, KUe4155 
Keiiey, 9'ml5 
KMoqq, RobeAtl38 
KmdaJll, J aim, 7 
Kemejif, Adcm 7, 155 

Km^OM,, ^UbZOMM P. 139 

Km,, Bill 16 

Km, KevM Mieluid 155 

KiMa, K(Mml39 

Kmm, UzlO, 139 
Kinched, Di. P(jd(wdl30 
Kmchd, J oik 7, 65 
Kiuq, JoIm 12, 38 

Ku/uw, Rob 7 

KiMkjjJood, JeUica 6, 16 

KvuLclum, Mih 12, 155 

Kum, JeoMiM 139 

Katk, Jeff 47 

Khm, CeL, 58, 65, 130 

Kleim, Aiikowj 73 

Km 14, 63, 68,139 

{im,. Lama 90, 155 
Lam 17 139 

^^ 6, 139 
Kmuff, Ami 32, 50, 51 
Kiwuitk, Julie, 11 
KuiUon,, Kdtlte/ujn 155 
Komig, Julie 6, 139 
Koivk, Julie 139 



Kokud, Jemum 139 

Kokkm, MLekkl55 

Kolh, LonLl55 

KJh, RioJmdM, 139 

Kmtiew, Launm 10 
KnJJlex/eK,, FnoMk 139 

Konth/eM,, %;. 7, 139 
Kou, Am} 11, 155 
Kuhik, Deme 8, 11, 155 

Kutiz, Kutihemi 6 
i, Jvwwe 156 




Laumclie, Jotge 156 
Laud, Juanda 130 
Lrnuhj, Meiuida 139 
LauekeM, Lam 68 
Lane, KimII, 156 
LoMidell, Lame 20, 156 
Latiza, Janed 7 
Lanzaena, Manixrl2, 156 
Lao; T(M lb 
Lapnim, Daitielk 131 
URue, MuMel5 
LailSioolc, Ljm Ame 156 
LailcDuJikl, Mike 38 

LdtikmL, HiUfi 6, 60, 139 

LdJH, Cyndi 6, 156 
Ldthwi, Aleamden, 156 
Lauiteuee, Jen, 9, 15, 68 
Lauiioii, ClMitiplm 156 
Lead,, Jeff 139 
Lead, Lujcy 11, 139 
LeoM,, Julie Mt 71 
Leai/i}, Mike, 7 
Lee, PmiSftDoug 86 
Lem, Kami 15, 68, 74 
Udz, A^ell56 



187 



La^, Dotma, u 
Lmxr, C^/d^hm 139 
Lem, Dt. A.J. 131 
Im/w, Tmtfi 3^ 
UqIMvi, Ma^ 21 
imkum, (Jlkl39 

UaMm, Gmikl5, 74, 86 

Lloijl Tia,iyicKsMml39 
LcMeiM, lugm 10 
LoMomctr, Hide 47 
L(wq, De«Ue,156 
Long, Duim 6, 156 

Long, Di. Nad 131 

Long, EkzaheOoMO 

Lo*y, Uz 42, 43 

Long, Tom 15 O 
Loi/fqo', Jody 140 
Loiigo-, Jaioii 15b 
Loptz, Tom 21 
Lonmm, NuuJlzl40 

Lo^, Abba 11, 89, 90 

LouglouM oif/m, 20 
LoveM, CiMdyl56 
Lomvuf, Am& 156 
LouJ&y, Dcu/id 131 
LouiMOM,, DehbiA 6 

Lucai, KiM 32, 35 
Lum, PiMp 131 

Lucai, Robe^l4 
Ludmgtm, Climij 10, 140 
Lugo-, Ce&m 156 
Liiltgm, RaUm Maxi 156 



-M- 



I Jem 9 
Mamdd, Jmd(&il56 
MagoAim, Dl. Ehzabetk 131 
Magubij, ^^^ft 7, 58 



^cuuka 140 
Mamm, Lua Kag 156 
MaJff, Mamj 11, 156 

MwuA, Mdm 140 
Mcmk, Kmtie, 96 

Mmcldml, KiuHe, 6 
Mwvm, £owja 6 

Monk, Clmtj 6, 156 

Mawmjy, £(mim 156 

Mekia 11, 140 

■CtucM 32 
MmU, €uim 17, 32, 156 

MeviUji, B'U)ohl5 
MwSLg, WilhmMO 
Maidmii, Mih 47 
Maioti, Dmridl56 
Mauml, KiuImMO 
Mauglim, Jaion 7, 140 
Mourn, UzlOO 
Mamo, Bobby 47 
McAim, l^edOmllMO 
McAUmi, Jmll 

MS'tuk, AmzMO 

McCandki, OehomkMO 

MdCmjki, Jodl40 

McCaMg, Jody M. 11, 65, 140 

McCoiL, Amj 51 

MeCoMh, Aikiey 15, 156 
I PaJJudc 7, 140 

I Laxm 20 

MoDomid, Monk 21 

McDougk, £kik 156 

MtDou), MaAgan£20 
MeEli/em,, Tmy 10 
McjGidtk, Cmmll, 63 

Mc^naO,, HeaOm 8, 156 
McjGiadeM, LonllO 
MJlndtk, Kua1ml57 
MaKem, EiiJc 44, 45 

MaKmm, Pat 12, 13, 40 

M(,bm, Juh 9, 20, 71 

MoMim, B'iyml57 



■i, Caney 15 
McNoMj, Mmmk 10 
McQueiUoK,, Guigm Am 157 

McQwom, KMml5, 68, 157 

Mmdoitik, Clmk Made 140 
Meagltm, ClvuitlM 157 
Meaglm, Janm 157 
MedJey, Ke£l6, 17, 62 

\, cm 44 

zm, Jahoi/il7, 157 
MmM, Btim 16, 157 
l l\l^a 9, 11, 157 

I ToMl41 
MmiJtt, Famii 157 
Mey&i, Jeff 157 
Meym, MeUj 9, 157 
Mey&i, Wootlyl57 
Meym, GnemMk, 10, 73 
Meym, Lama 157 
Mm, Dam 17, 157 

•I, BdgaK Peten, 157 

i, Sydney 11 

%, Keml4, 141 

1, MiMm 14, 157 

Mekia 10 

Ridmdl57 
%, -CaiaM, 15 
1, Tarn C. 157 

Clm/umiM 32, 157 



% EilzaheOv W. 141 
% Jemilen, 6, 157 

MoM, Jeff 14 

MoVteak, FiMk 21 

Momug&i, Demie^ 11 

Monk, Ty 21, 157 

Modgovmy, M&viMk 157 

Moody, KiuIm 6, 96, 157 

Moom, DiMlml57 
MotaJk, Tema,157 
Monm,, Jeto 9 



188 



Momoild, Kadl57 


Monqm, CimfllS 


Motqm, KM. 8, 157 


Mo4ack, CmgMl 


McmMij, Km1ml6, 37, 34, 68, 


69 


Mo4m, TkmijMl 


Monmalk, Fm^c 63 


Mem, KMjlO, 62 


Mom, MuhkW? 


MovtUm, Jam 45, 51, 157 


Mm, r. 17 


Mdt^dai, Bnim M. 141 


Mouwta, KaAjm,15, 141 


Moui&i, Gun 14, 141 


MudU, JoU 21 


Munik, £(!6tt38 


Mmk, F'iUi 98, 141, 218 


Muqavm, Mih 27, 38, 41 


MuIU, Km%15 


MuMm, Joim 7 


Mwiply, Gi^i 9, 20, 37, 71 


Munpluj, JoU 21, 63 


Munply, KMyl57 


Munpluj, £1^10, 141 


Mumuj, Joijll, 157 


Mimuj, Muhdl57 


Mumtfj, Cluuie. 7 


Muu&i, Pi,. Poadll31 


Miizzs, Mekia 11, 141 


M<fm, Mo% 15 


MjjtJjke,, NuuA157 


^m i W ^ms' 


Nailky, Joijce,16, 157 


Naik DoMMi 47 


NaiHiiUi, NdJml57 


Ndteik, KdOuj 20 



C Biiml6 

NAoti, Bixwh 6, 68 
Moii, JmJm 42, 43 
Moi^, RLdcl58 

NeuiuuM, Joma Doum 141 
Newuim, NoM/y 20, 158 
Nq(y, Nqml41 
Nquym, Loom, 158 

NicU, JiM 7, 63, 65, 141 

NuJuAoif,, Jolm,158 
NUmM, Gujf 7 
l\li£mai, HmOm 42, 43 
NoLl, MaieaA 8 
Noim, Momy 8 
Noim, Mamy 10, 141 
NowiM, Dumui 24 
Novak, Cija 42, 43 
Novak, Tow, 12 
NwUm, £4ukl31 

% Jokk 7, 16, 158 

N!0um, Matt 16, 21 




'Bnim, Clm 16, 158 

Comon,, RijOM, 141 

O'DomeM, MegiM,17, 18, 20, 68, 

158 

O'Ham, WiJhm Knaiq 141 
KeeJe,, Oi. KeiM 131 

'Um, M-Mk 98, 141 
O'Nd, Em 18, 158 
O'NeM, Clmizl7,158 
O'NeM, Fnu,17 

O'NeM, MuJudl58 

O'ReMj, Leigk45 
Odqw,, Aiuta 68 
OenM, KewujMl 
Oqdm, Amlh, 5, 20, 141 



Ola,, Ami 101 
Olu/m, Ammda, 158 
Oiit/m, Gwtqe, 14 

Okmi, MamL 142 
OIL, M. 17 
Oheii, KiM 15 
Owma, BduJiM, 3o 
Onckvul, Debil58 

04mA, Gdl 

Okbonm, JemiJm, 158 

Oimm, Mdim 20, 142 
Oi^i, Gmqt 7, 142 
Oui, Pe& 7 
Oium, Edu/in 36 

Ovmtm, ASmj R. 29, 30, 142 
Oi/ffUm,, Beckfj 9 
Ouim,, Lwwk 131 

OuJM, MdSku) 38 
Oujm, Kedl6, 17 
Ouim, M. 17 
Oxk, Norn 158 




Padteco', Mmmlu 11 
rkitilm, £l£plam& 158 
Pak, B.J. 12 
Pak, B J ay 158 

\, FeMUurM, 142 

n, Piana 51 

1, PeMl6, 17,158 

t, JuliA 6 

1, Lauml29 
PoMCo', ■Cean 14 
Papadm, ■Clae&f 158 
PoAken,, Kvtk 21, 158 
Padi, Todd 21 
Pama, LuU 21,25 
PaMoiii, BdkU, 142 



189 



PwUkee,, MeAm&17, 20 
Pamn^ao-, Eilmn y 
Paidna, Bm G. 158 
PM, AaMl58 

Pdtd, Mmdl58 

VadJil6,17,158 
\, MM, 68 

Pamim, Ai^A 9, 58, 142 
Paa/iui, Reheceal58 
Peufi^, RaMlKedml42 

Pead, Pcml5, 68,142 
Pem«i, Juhl6, 142 
Peepiei, Ka/m, 15 
PeiMm, Lama 158 
PenJdMM, Jeffie^ K. 142 
P&wmH/o, JaiM 47 
PemU, l/ielo^l58 
Pevuf, Biiim 7 
Pmtj, Dt. Achieme, 131 
Petmm, Cl/oiiMim, 158 

PS^, U 8, 158 

Pfm, £ // 

Dm 21, 158 

t, MuJA158 

U, Tim 158 

'if,i, Towja 22, 158 

Piuppi, Kate 20 

Pumd, RobaO. 158 

Pim^, Ron 76 
Pickm, Dmwa 131 
Pi£jm«t, ■Ctamf 8 
Pimm, JuIiA 73 
PiguimM, •Cuzam&142 
Pih, DMiel58 
PtlqiiM, Mdiua 17, 18 
Puuhi, RaMtl42 

PijmJt, MdilJlJ. 142 

Pumil, 0%. DomU131 
Pimme,, Qall6, 17, 38 

PuSk, M 1^^ 

Pm, Bill 7 

Phm, Odoial58 



Plod, Qteplm 158 
PLm, Juh 20, 142 
P(fjk, Pad W. 142 
Pogm, Jmwfen, 51, 142 
Poilacelc, U 6 
RMfj, Lami£' 6 
Potftirtmo, Deipldml58 
PomMb, AtHhuy 63 
m, Pem^ 15, 17158 

Pouiett, ApdlO, 158 

PtaOm, B. 17 

Pmiod, BiM13, 158 
Ptgi,Jmlil29,143 

Ptob&it, Dcu/e, 68 
P'copei, Akoa, 6, 143 
Pwit, CiHdtf 11 
Pmmk, Riek 16, 17, 159 
PumM, Dotuuf 7 
PuidzzL, Bdrnwlff 159 




Radii/omjk, ^atuha 159 
Raqm, Dmuj 14, 36, 37 

Raqloid, 9ilm 9, 20, 63, 68 

Raiond, Ruikvd \l\l. 143 

RomJL, Robe£l59 

Rami, JoMtth 10 
Ramoui, JeaMttk' 73 
Rail(a, Jaepk 21, 159 
RaiMmea, Pau/ivll, 159 

Ram, Ray 7, 16, 24, 25 

Rehbvi, TiM 21 

ReM, Kdkl59 

ReduM, DauiK, 143 
Red, Kaki 0. 143 

l Lual 

KSjl5 

ReMm/lm, Enia 7, 68, 159 



ReMimz, CIvumIImIO, 159 
ReyiuM, Kdtluj 15 
RktOgam, Maiv63 
Ricciatil, Mama 14, 38 

yiiddk 8, 128 
Aon, KSj6 
Rudiwukm, Km^ 10 
RicUwud, Aivlmo 16 
Riclitjvo, J aim 131 

Rixm, £mi. A. 159 

RlMoauqk, Ksk 38 
Ridley £um> 8, 10 

Riygi, KaMl94 

Rig^ Aiiuon, 20, 143 

Rij/em, Clajujiliml59 

Roack, RoM143 

Robem, Jmy 10, 42, 43 
Rodalc, Dau)t(,131 
RodigtBZ, Yoi/aim£,159 
Rotitadc, Rifanl43 
Rodniqmz , LomrM, 143 
Rofkqmz, MayUl43 
RotbugiBZ, Towaiita 159 
Rogm, \/\laMiKl43 
Roqm, LamiA 143 
Rolie,, Dsi/e 7 
Rojai, Kd^ia 159 

Rojoi, Muikdl59 

Rojai, YoMjZza 159 
Rowback, Manlmk 143 
RomM, Rlelmd 159 
Roiuk, Malt 14 

Rood, Doug 38 

Rootk, Gilhmt:7 
Roieb^t/m, Jolm 159 

Roim, MeL^129,159 

Ron, ClmnhAl31 

Ron, Mekio, 20 

Roit, Biian 14 
RoitcMZo, Tmcy 6 

RMa, BiM159 

RdOt, JemiJk 51, 159 



190 



^oOmkuw', Monk 13 
Roijk, ToMuuj Kouj 143 
Rue, MuMk La 63 

Ruffim,, Clm 14 

Rupp, Kip 143 

Ruik, KsiM 36 

Ruik, T.J. 36, 44, 45 

RmeM, Bill 36 

RmeM, Lauml43 

RmeM, MUiil6, 20, 70,159 

Ruiio; Angeiil31 
RAige,, A,dm 159 
Rijok, Oebonak M. 159 

Rjjm,J.T.159 

Rtfm, Tom 10,17 




Qadhm, Ehahetkl43 
£awMom, DoMiMitjue, 159 
^oLuum, Nikki 9 
£amum, E&ai 7 
£amim,, RobmU 63 
£aM, PdUadc 28, 29 
£(uiho>m, ■Cem, 143 

£aMtU, Mmd Ot U 152 

^ojichz, AiSowj 144 
Ctmckz, JoIm a. 144 
QoMkmL, Ha/ioU 7 

^m, PdlMdcl59 

QwMaqo', Vvumm 159 
£(u^m, AtiUmj 58 
^aJpiMJ^&M, JomL 47 
^(vyemC, £lm 20, 68, 159 
^auitjen,, Clmii 47 
^canhnmqk, Jeff 144 
QckaM&v, K. 17 

CckA, MeUj 32 
^cUeiM,, Mojik 44, 45 



Qdmdc, KaMl3, 159 

£cUh, l\licA144 
^ckMm, Muklkl5 
€cUtz, Pkl 21, 144 

£dmk, £lacaj 20 

SeotC, Ei&en E. 144 

^cM, EiimCoiml59 

^cM, Wuk ^l ^B 

S^mdM, AiUeigkll 

£mmi, Ailikj 159 

£mmt, NonemW, 136, 140, 157, 

159 

£ewj, Dauin 6 
^ee^, Ta6(&144 
■Cee&y, Tom 38 
£eMm, Mcvuf 144 
^vih, dmHe 6 
£mM, Robe£l44 
£mdt, Dme. 11, 144 
Cwixk, Ck>tyll60 
^lioA, Mom 16, 160 
^ItapiJur, £etk 7 
£kauqliMeuij, TltoMOi 131 

£lm,, FiMii^ 20, 160 

£ka, Cluti^mll 
£l/t£a, Cuuiij 11 
QlmJlij, Lama, 15 
€kaiy. Lama Am 144 
£l/imuMm, EilzaheOt 144 
\, Am( 144 

\, Clm 46, 47 

^kotMokm,, dtiid 160 
^luJke, NuuM15 
£ihoi^, MaAkl60 

£iql, Mudiod E. 144 

•LiMMoKi, JemJ&iwO 

Cimmk, Ku^e4 11, 16, 65, 144 

SiiyMm, 0emel44 

£lappefj, RmeM 144 

Jemijfew L 10, 144 
TaucWi 32 

£mhfi, l4optl44 



^Mitk, Em 22 
£mtk, Jeff 46, 47 

£mtk, JetuufeA, 6 

QwUk, KeVm 47 

£wJlk, Pdlmal44 

£mtk, Ray 145 

Smlk, Ryan, 21 

£imOi, <sVftt 13 

^mtU, Tiffrnj 16, 20, 160 

£mlk. Tow, 15, 160 
£uu)ut, JaMtll, 160 

£iM, Ami ^0, 145 

■Ciiipei, Bnuce, 160 
■Cuii/elf, Tatmuf 20 
^mdg'im, Kenl Lym 145 
^dth; Am Mania 160 
£owueil, Jolm, 7 
Qpem,, Oovi,157, 160 

£pijc0i, Clm 21 

Qthnhuck, Ckuun, 38 
£lm,. Lance, 16, 160 
SaHeki, AiMy 6, 51 
Stijitm, J aim, 29, 31 
&edJey, Adam 14, 160 
Qteek, Rob&it63 
£lepp, Manfey 145 
£lMeM, Ctiay 7, 68 
Qth/ei^on, Matt 24, 160 
£lejuia£, Don 21 
QHuianC, Luall, 69, 160 
^tekney, PeJe/i 160 
£lhM>U, Ben C. 160 
Qtaqim, Miuy 145 
£lme„ M 00:7 9 

rw MiM, 38 

StbmuidteJi, Ja&^ue 160 
Qthi/en, Miekd47 

£iMhkj!i, JaAmlO, 68, 145 

SOuygo-, ToMtna 15 
£lmbk Yoii,38 
Qtuwit, Deniie, 160 
CUk, DamU21, 63 



191 




J, MaMll, 37 
QuMmem, D. 1/ 
QundmiMM, £ana, Ju 
£iuuiq'im, B. 17 
^uphdc, Aiidnml60 
£upp>mdt, M. 17 
^wvfcu^, Mekui 11, 160 
■Cimmce,, Steji/etv 160 
Stuydaud, On,. Poxm So 
^(ittm, Jemy 42 
^iizuJd, Ketuuf 160 
^u/emtf, ^lep/tm 131 



Tahemm, Clud 7 
Tahocuk, MaM 145 
Jam, Kam, 45, 160 
ToMpke,, Dale, 131 
TaptiM,, Q^tlmvub 160 
Tafttm, DauiiJ45 

TmjU, MuJJk 9, 11, 17, 18, 50, 
51, 62, 145 

TayU, Pld21 
Tcujion,, Tltomi 145 

Ted, MMvidl37, 145 

Tei^t, Bmly 8, 9, 11, 128 

Teipd, Fomt44, 160 
TekU, B. 17 

TeMpletm, Jemuy 14, 68 
Tenq, Owm C. 145 
Teuhim,, Andy 21 

TUl, Qth/m, T. 145 
Tkomi, Joijc^ rt 22, 160 
Tlwmi, JuL15, 145 

Tlmmi, May 160 
Tkomi, ^1b/eiil46 
Tlwwai, Tnacy 6 
TlwMOi, Tmmfife, 29 



Timmh, Wa(kl46 
TlwMpldM, B. 17 
TkowpkM, Omic 7 
TkoMpim, Jeff 14, 68 

TlwMpiM, Jen 15, 146 

Tlm^m, Many Film 20, 22, 160 
TlwMpim, ^keMey 146 
Tlwm, CySda 45, 131 
Tux,, ^teplml60 

Tdk, Nu!A 6, 146 

Tjc, MoAiam 11 

ToJmm, Ami£uell,128,146 

ToMpkiM, Manlyin,160 
Totyek, Qimm, 146 
TotHMeim, W. Tnej£l4 
Tonm, Cni^im, 160 
Tnah, \/y99 
Tnakai, Aiyia 20 
Twhik, Pelm A. 160 
Tnmhloy, Betkl46 

TSmylO, 32, 33 
, Mdual46,148 

TdMye/v, Biian loO 

TumJS, Ckmtoplml46, 148 

Tnmekoi/a, Janmm 37, 160 
Tiott, Neekel(al60 
Tuiiks,, Cwtm 32 
Tuck, LutiA 15 

Tuddi, KiM 11, 160 

Timm, DmM 29, 146, 148 

Tume/i, DauJth 160 



(Jciom, Lm 20, 160 

Ueda, Tarn 11 

Uihnick, Deho>mkl46, 148 

UMknuiood, Oeneic 146, 148 

Uni, l\likkLl46, 148 





Vad, Jeff 21 

Valmii, Gwe^ 44, 45, 160 

{/aliedb. Tarn 15 

Van Ankd, Genewy 147 

\/m f^oolc, £lh/e, 13 

l/miMe&i, Todd 160 

l/a^, Kmal47,148 

\/aMM Hel, hleaaml6, 17, 78, 161 
Vam, €lepkaM&17, 20, 36, 37 
l/oMwy, CkiiUll, 17, 18 
\/anhy, ^uum 161 
l/eite,, ^tei/eu, 161 

i/e&JU, RHJum 147, 148 

\/Lek, TaL^^P.145 
ViMam/a,, Tim 16, 161 
ViMmw/e, Qlmyl 45 
vuuoti, Ttacy 8 
VmiwB, cd 13 

i/oa Ped, ^to 7 13, 147, 148 

\/oie. Ami 147, 148 




BeJUll, 68, 69,147, 
148 

\/\laikm. Pad 16 

QcMl47, 148 
Biuui, 14 
^cM29 

Bhm 29, 31 
Rudv 68, 161 

KaAm 148 

, Bta,161 

, KaAm 147 
Wad, RaMlO, 161 
Wanhid, Adnim 7 



192 



Wankop. MoAy 147, 148 

Wamvi, Jama lol 

Wcmet, JemiJ&i 161 

Wawtea, Jofjm 25 

WailuMqtm, Aifqdufue, 17 , 18, 161 

Walm, Km 11 

WdUm, Rulkl47,148 
WoUm, Amij 148 

WdUm, Memj 147 

Wcm, JoU p. 161 

l/]/afil£i, Jttk 47 

l/\/eMe^, M7, 16 

mm, JiM 9, 15, 68 

WeidketS, B'iim,161 

Wei^d, MmM 15, 63, 161 

Wew, BiM21 
Weitiuim, Amdmui 161 

'i, JaionlS, 161 

i, £em 44 
l/\/eM,Jaiml47148 
l/\/eM, ^Itdkl61 

\/\lmhi, MIO, 147 

Ttieiawl 

■f, £cMl59 

Weithmlc, WiMm,161 
WuU, Wmlijl^i 
WatpU, Meg 15 
WUiMq, l/idiB M(m 147 
\/\llmJlm, B'taSijl61 
\/\llMtm, Kiutjif^ 6, 161 
Wkmit, Muhk 16 
Wm, Jamdl6, 60, 161 

Wlud, MidJk 42, 43, 161 
Wlutb, NdBhlO 

Wlu&lmd, Came, 10 
Wlutk, CarnmU, 161 
WldtU, Rick 105 

i, Lm 9 

<,, £ttud/ia 131 
Wdm, Jeffrnj 161 
J, Jaim 161 

i, Pi. Giem 27, 29 



Rob 29, 30 
WdkMM, Cludl61 
WiAmw, ^1hcy 10 
WiMum, Adam 14 
WiMoMi, Paplml5 

38 



, Joojma 9 

h, Ju^l6, 161 
Wdhm, ^Imiill, 161 
WMi, M. 17 
WiAm, Bob 38 
moi^, M42 
WiAoii, KiM 32 
WuiMl, Nikldll 

WiMlS, RobM VOM, 6 

WiMitm, MatuJjj 6, 63 
Wiiflmtm,, Cituly 10 
Waemilhi, Towjall, 161 

Woa, AU 21, 36 
Wood, Gmqe, 29 
Wood, Lawuj 36 

WovdL, M131 

Wotdoti, Joff 20 
l/i/oodtuatd, Pt. Jaum 131 
Wowkitk,, Ku£l61 
WotkjMM,, £lmwi 17, 18 
W6(k, Mixkkl61 
Wniqld;, Bmlj 161 
WnigK MaAcia 11, 71 




Yeag&v, Aildy 15 
YmngiM., PauJtL 161 
VmJcei, MiMe.161 
Vomg, Apidl61 
Yomg, Pn,. Monk 131 



ZoMm, KdOmim 161 
ZiU, CaUil61 
ciMMfOiMui, Gail 2u 
Zippajj, Tnicial6, 161 



193 




194 ADS 






RAISING INTEREST IN 
STETSON 

he DeLand Community has 
a great deal to offer Stetsons 
students, faculty, and staff. 
Area business owners offer 
discounts to students in 
coupon booklets passed out at the begin- 
ning of each school year. The business 
owners also donate money to various 
sports booster clubs and organizations, 
as well as participating in various Stet- 
son sponsored events. 

The area businesses look to the Stet- 
son Reporter and the Hatter Yearbook 
for advertising and as information 
sources. 

The Hatter Yearbook would like to 
thank the area businesses and students 
parents and friends who bought ads in 
and for PASSIN' THE HAT in support 
of Stetson and the Hatter Yearbook. 



The Stetson University 
sign outside of the Lynn 
Business Center. 



ADS 195 



/ jxjy Y^j Keep ilJuj(ru/(g f^ / SXj x'j 




hm/otl(je ^cottfamly 




196 ADS 



You are 
a wind 
beneath 


/^ 


Love Always, 

Mom 

& 


our / 




k Dad 


sails' / J 




L 







Attention Poets 

The National Library of Poetry will av\/ard 
$12,000 in prizes to over 250 poets in the North 
Annerican Open Poetry Contest. Entry is free 
and every peonn entered has a chance to be 
published in a deluxe, hardbound anthology. 

To enter, send ONE original poem to The 
National Library of Poetry, 11419 Cronridge Dr., 
P.O. Box 704 - XN, Owings Mills, MD 21117. The 
poem should be no more than 20 lines, and the 
poet's name and address should appear on the 
top of the page, A new contest opens July 1 , 
1993 



^iWm^ 



^M^ 




Bz^ncL (^unck^^on GALLEDY & ADT STUDIO 



110 N. Woodland Blvd. 

DeLand, Florida 32720 

904-734-8871 



ADS 197 




Working at a professional level that 
ordinarily might take years of apprentice- 
ship back home, Peace Corps Volunteers 
also enjoy a unique life experience 
overseas. And when they return, they 
find that international firms, domestic 
corporations, and government agencies 
value the skills and knowledge acquired 
while overseas. 

Peace Corps works in more coun- 
tries now than ever before, and needs 
people from many disciplines — educa- 
tion, technical trades, health, the environ- 
ment, agriculture, community develop- 
ment, engineering, and the sciences. 
Whether you have a degree, or several 
years of experience, Peace Corps may be 



able to use your skills as no other 
employer would — while giving you the 
opportunity to immerse yourself in a new 
culture... and help to improve the lives of 
others while enriching your own. 

You'll also receive some significant 
financial benefits: $5400 when you 
return, partial cancellation 
of Perkins Loans 
and deferments of 
many others, living 
and travel ex- 
penses, language 
and technical 
training, and more. 
Can you afford not 
to volunteer? 




For more information and 
an application call: 
1-800-468-2745 



198 ADS 




ROSS 

WE'RE SO 
PROUD OF ALL 
YOU'VE DONE 
AND BECOME 
IN ONLY 22 
YEARS! 

LOVE, 

DAD, MOM & 

SCOTT 




R 



y 



You handled yourself real well in those four years. We 
are very proud. We hope that life will bring you fulfill- 
ment and happiness. 

Congratulations 

Love, 

Dad & Mom 





ANNE with all your many abilities, assets, and 

"ancestry" .... you can climb as high as the treetops!!! 



We love you 

Mom, Ben, John & Peter 
Boomer, Pepper & Starfire 




ADS 199 



ANNETTE ALENO 




"1 know the plans I have for you, " 
declares the Lord, 

"plans to prosper you and not to harm you, 
plans to give you hope and a future. " 



Jeremiah 29:11 NIV 




We are very proud of you and love you 
dearly. 

Mom & Dad 



A sweet young girl to a sweet young lady. May God 

always let his countenance shine upon you and bless 

you. And remember never give up on your hopes 

and dreams. 

All our love, 
Dad and Mother 



Congratulations George! 

We are so proud of you!! 

Success, health and happiness in your future. 

Love, Mom, Dad, Pete and Andrew 



DR. JEFFREY L. TIMKO AND ASSOCIATES 

FAMILY EYECARE O.D., P. A. 



Contact Lenses 
Optical Services 



840 North Stone Street 

DeLand, Florida 32720 

(904) 734-1766 



200 ADS 




ADS 201 




From "K" to "Grad" you've always made your mark along the way, 
Awards were yours, from "Class Citizen" to "Prez", "NX^o's Who" and OK. 

You've made us very proud and as you graduate, sweet Lu, 
We wish you love, joy and great success in all you do. 

CONGRATULATIONS 



Mom, Dad, Bubba, Sissy and Joey, and 
With Special Love, Odyssey 



L 




JOAmEPALEOLOe 

Pum niaf1ao& to- Cociitbih, 
rum iMmftrtcr adalt 

and cM M betloem 
Nm&i oME/ qWm, 

lteMacI(& ottewv 
Owv qmitpni/k and Ic»/e> 

iM, (foil cam, be, imi. 
iV wiM oiuiayL btHmtuia^, 

MJf deoA, 

We^fedttidtijoa'illtMe, 
a place, iM, oun, ItmU 
Fom/en, Ue, niSof t^owi lilt 

You, will be, kucjcmful 

5&«- Im/e, uil(dt (tUtkei 
l(r be, a qnjidt (tauqI/iiJvi, a, peMoft,, 

oiU iotmloff a u)ih 




W£ ARE l/ERV PROUD OF YOU! 



-of/e,, 



Mow,, Dad, Midad, l^ama & Gtrndpa, 
(MuMi, RJ. mdCkieckuui "U, W7 



202 ADS 



-J^oid fait to dreami, 
^or if dreams die 
<JLife id a brohen-winaed bird 
^Ivat cannot flu. 

^J^old fait to dreams, 
^or witen dreami ao 
cJLil-e ii a barren field 
frozen with inow. 



- oLan/iiton^J^uqne 



•.an^ 




K^kip, 



id oj^ tm 



e are do ueru proucL of ine 
nciue m 



yecome. 



man uou 

U 

r v jotner and eJDad 



e love uou, 



ADS 203 



T 



I 



N 



A 



Continue with jonr success, 
i)nt remember to stop and 
smell the roses! 

Dad, Mom, and Anita 




Christopher, 

We are very 
proud of you. 

Love, Mom & Dad 




"THE THDEE 
MUSKATEEDS" 

You were the first to make the Big (Step 
Marc, congratulations and the very best 
to you. God be with you in all walks of 
Life and may He choose the right path for 
you always. The two muskateers to follow. 
We are sooooo proud of you. 



Love, Mom, Dad, Leo, and Annamarie 



204 ADS 



f^{4/mAe/i/tu ^Au^di/yie &^mw/rich 




'e a/m ^ ^i^w^itd m uofyi - mUii {€me mcwi u(M4/t 



ADS 205 




Denise, 

You 

''stressed'' 

your way 

through 

school 

and now 

you're 

REALLY 

STRESSED 

OUT! 



Life holds many challenges 
but we know you're up to 
them. 
Congratulations! 



Love, 
Mom. Dad. 
and Russel 



Anthony, 

We are proud of your 
accomplishments. May 
God continue to guide 
you and bless you. 

Love - Mom 8. Dad 



Kelly, 

Congratulations ! 

you finally did it» 

Love Moma 





Troy, 

May God continue to 

lead you always. 

We are so very proud of 

you. 

Love, Mom & Dad 



Dear Leigh, 

We are so very proud of you. 

We love you so very much. 

All the Best 

Your Mom and Dad and 

Your loving sisters, Rayan 

and Lauren. 

F.S. Allie is proud of you too!! 



96 ADS 




i^Ofd, no^, "dd, cmd^d 



ADS 207 



Congratulations, Scott! 




This is the beginning 
of a new and won- 
derful life. We are 
all here for you. 

Love, 

Grandma, Grandpa, 

Mom, Shawna, and 

your Father, too. 




Congratulations 
Jennifer Kohms 

The Best 
Roomie Ever! 

Lois Bass 




l/iA/ty tove^ c^/y\^ la^iAde/t 
"Dad, r>1ci/u^ &(e^, 



^"7 



& r^ik^ 




Michael, 

I am tru!\; 

blessed to 

have llou as 

mi; son. 

Success is 

i;ours. 

Love, 

Mom 



t^» 



-/^tJrw, "Dad & Ki 



siun^ 



208 ADS 




L^onaratuiatlon5 rlataiie! ulau ail uour dt 



y. all your dream.6 come true. 



We csLoue Ljou, 
iVlom, f-^adyett CSf J^auA 



ADS 209 



Cynthia 

Education is the key to everything, and dreams conne 
true through hard work and deternnination. I'm so 
proud of all that you have done already, and keep 
striving tor the top in all that you do. 

Love, Nan 



Anthony 

We are proud of your accomplishments. May God con- 
tinue to guide you and bless you. 

Love, Mom & Dad 




SHERI, 

you finally 

made it! 

We are very 

proud of you. 

GOOD LUCK! 



We Love 

You, 

Dad, Mom 

and 

Kelly 

(Class of '95) 




TREASURE ISLAND INN 



We do 

Oceanfront Banquets 

with style... 

Conventions •¥ Reunions 

Meetings 4- Receptions 

Seminars 4- Pool Deck Parties 

Tiieme Parties 








2025 S Atlantic Ave, Daytona Beach Shores 
904-255-8371 



Watching you climb the ladder of education and 
attain your goals has been one of life's greatest 
pleasures for us. 

Love, Your entire family 
especially Nom 8i Dad 



210 ADS 




ADS 211 



Ray 



It seems like just yesterday you were starting 
kindergarten. 





Then it was graduating Academy ... and now 
college. Son, we love you and are very proud of 
you. May the Lord continue to walk beside you. 

Dad, Mom, Heather, and the gang 



Mark HoUey 




We want you to 
know we admire 
and enjoy your 
sound, steady, 
enthusiastic, 
creative, caring, 
and delightful 
personality. 



Love, 
Your favorite fans 



CONGRATS FOR 

DOING IT IN 

"4" ANDY! 

LOVE G, S, K 8c D 




luJO' douJn t«/^ MotA tb' gcr. 

Hang uv Ume^! 
We^ loi/tijouj. 

Mom & Dad 



12 ADS 



Congratulations, 
Will 




We love you, 
Mom, Dad, and Tom 



Marcia 




Yo u have 
come so far! 
From kinder- 
garten to col- 
lege gradua- 
tion — we are 
so proud of 
you! 



Love, 
Mom, Dad, Diane and Kristin 




Diehard Paul-Hu<s 



We are all very proud of your many accom- 
plishments. May your travels be prosperous on 
this new pathway in the journey of your life. 
And may all your hopes and dreams of the 
future be fulfilled. 

Love always. 

Mom, Dad, Bernard, Andrew, Stephane, Susan 
& Eric 



ADS 213 



E 



ClfMciuH ... 



St, 




I ' • TT ' 




tiioflisi 



The Rev. Dr. Terry M. Mar kins 
Worship: Sunday 8:15 and 10:30 a.m. 



£^cr do- KctidmtuioVujiMg: 
my food cowi^ mm? on, uuj JitiMk.' on, uuj 
clMei? (Tlm,& cmthtmgi 1k,pagata 
one, aLimjk CMmued ahouC.) Yowi Fdthn, 
in kam, biouH Uat ifoti need ail Ihie, 
tmgi. Initetd, be, anux'wed ahof/e, amj- 
llum dig, uJilU lie KitigdoM or God (ml 
uitlk uikdtk, ne/juUtei of (joti, and l»e i/JiM 
bneiTuk- (jou, uittU oMUieie, 6thn,1kngi. 

b:31-23 



Fr. David I. Suellau, Rector 

Sunday Services: 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 am. 
Weekday Services: Tuesday 7:30 a.m.; Thursday 10:00 t 
Canterbury Club: Mondays from 6 to 7:30 p.m. 



First Pfest)|erii 

ttlUfCtl 



Clyde M. Wiley, Pastor 

Worship Services: Sun. 8:30 a.m., 11:00 a., 

Sunday Church School: 9:45 a.m. 

(Nursery available for both worship 
services and Sunday Church School) 

Westminster Fellowship 



"To everything there is a : 
and a time to every purpose under the heaven. 

- Ecclesiastes 3:1 



214 ADS 






Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. 

Morning Service: 11:00 a.m. 

Sunday Evening: 6:30 p.m. 

Wednesday Bible Study & Prayer: 7:00 p.m. 

Radio WXVQ 1490 AM Mon-Fri 7:05 a.m. ISun. 11:30a.m. 
Phone: (904) 736-7412/738-1822 

-Ye shall know the truth. 

and the truth shall make you free" 

- John 8:32 



km ietitiem 





Tiuit m, Hie, LonJ, uiCtU all ijom kwit. 
Nam, leiy on uiluitijou, tldifk (jm Ioiovj. 
Reumxhen, Ue, Lmd, in, m/yHmg ym do-, 
aud k, uiiMilioul ijou, Ut, nl^lit uiay. 



3:5-6 



Schedule: 

9:30 a.m. Sunday School - Great College Class 

10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m.. Sunday Services 

7 p.m. Wednesday Praise & Bible Study 

College Home Fellowship 7:30 p.m. Thursdays 

"l^e are here to serve you!" 

Pastor Michael Medica 



Maxwell Johnosn, Minister 

(407)574-6008 

Sunday Church School: 9:30 a.m. 

Song, Praise and Prayer Service: Wed. 6:00 p.i 

Bible Study: Wednesday 6:30 p.m. 



ADS 215 



Karen Lazar and 

Michelle O'Lear 

at the Chalk-A- 

Thon. 




216 CLOSING 



,Jrt 




THE 



hai [lis,.. 

wear it! 



The year was full ofups 
and downs ^ but every- 
one stuck together to 
show their loyalty. The 
people of Stetson have 
grown a great deal this 
year. Our awareness and involvement 
with various groups on campus that 
deal with race^ ethnicity and alterna- 
tive lifestyles. We are proving to be a 
more diversified community of people. 
As this school year ends and the new 
one begins let% hope for more and 
remember If the Hat Fits Wear It. 



CLOSING 217 



Tres Mullis and Nancy Jones at 
the Hatter Howl. 



Lanie Lans- 

dell stops at 

the Hat Rack 

during 

FOCUS to get 

something to 

drink. 




218 CLOSING 




CLOSING 219 



MTWR 
YEARBOOK 

9DIT0R. . . JENNIFER MIERS: 

BUSINESS MANAGER. . . CYNTm 

DEQTEFANO 

ADVISORS: 

ML WOODS PARALD STUBBS 

WALSWORTH PUBLISHING COMPANY 
MISSY GREENE HOLLY HECKM AN 

SPECIAL Tf/AIVK^... 

Bnim ComM - Pkotbgnaplm Vtj Turn, - Pli^iaplm 

Dcudd Ai/M - Wiit&v - Nonm, ^eacmt 

Tm ^Mfdw cud Tom McCumm - €po^ liwr 

Cimk KwIm - ^poiU rluitoi 

Gmqe^ Aihm - BmehaM PltodA 

Pubiic RdaUofa OepoAtm^ 

Rdetf Ntitt- PltotbgiafilieK 

■CleUott Laiu ^ckm 

GemSA GnoMotk - ran, ^ 

pkotbgtapk of ei/edL 

m couMn tcoi/en,. 



220 



m 

Wedsworth Publishing Con^xnty 

306 North Kansas Avenue / MarccJine. Missouri 64658 USA